Interview with the cast of “The Ark” on Syfy

TV Interview!

Actors from "The Ark" on Syfy

Interview with actors and showrunners of “The Ark” on Syfy by Suzanne 1/27/23

I’ve watched 4 episodes of this show, and it’s already hooked me. Like the show’s creator, Dean Devlin, I’ve been a fan of good science fiction TV since I was a child. This is a good new show to add to the list. I hope it survives and does well. I’ve enjoyed many of Devlin’s shows, such as “Leverage” and “The Librarians.” Syfy was great about letting me interview most of the main cast from the show. I hope you enjoy the videos below of our interviews as much as I did!

Interview with showrunners Dean Devlin and Jonathan Glassner of “The Ark” on Syfy

Dean Devlin and Jonathan Glassner of "The Ark" on Syfy - photos from Instagram

 

Interview with Christina Wolfe and Shalini Peiris of “The Ark” on Syfy

Christina Wolfe plays Cat Brandice and Shalini Peiris plays Dr. Sanjivni Kabir in the new SYFY original series “The Ark.”

 

Interview with Christie Burke, Richard Fleeshman and Reece Ritchie of “The Ark” on Syfy

THE ARK -- Season:1 -- Pictured: Christie Burke as Lt. Sharon Garnet, Richard Fleeshman as Lt. James Brice and Reece Ritchie as Lt. Spencer Lane -- (Photo by: Aleksandar Letic/Ark TV Holdings, Inc./SYFY)

 

Interview with Ryan Adams and Stacey Read of “The Ark” on Syfy

THE ARK -- Season:1 -- Pictured: Stacey Read as Alicia Nevins and Ryan Adams as Angus Medford -- (Photo by: Aleksandar Letic/Ark TV Holdings, Inc./SYFY)

 

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THE ARK -- Pictured: "The Ark" Key Art -- (Photo by: SYFY)

The Ark

Premieres Wednesday, February 1, at 10 PM ET/PT on SYFY

“The Ark” takes place 100 years in the future when planetary colonization missions have begun as a necessity to help secure the survival of the human race. The first of these missions on a spacecraft known as Ark One encounters a catastrophic event causing massive destruction and loss of life. With more than a year left to go before reaching their target planet, a lack of life-sustaining supplies and loss of leadership, the remaining crew must become the best versions of themselves to stay on course and survive.

The series stars Christie Burke, Richard Fleeshman, Reece Ritchie, Stacey Read and Ryan Adams.

Dean Devlin (“Independence Day,” “Stargate”) and Jonathan Glassner (“Stargate SG-1”) are co-showrunners and executive producers alongside Marc Roskin and Rachel Olschan-Wilson of Electric Entertainment. Jonathan English of Balkanic Media and Steve Lee serve as producers.

“THE ARK” LANDS FEBRUARY 2023 ON SYFY

KEY ART AND OFFICIAL FIRST TEASER RELEASED FOR SYFY’S NEWEST ORIGINAL SERIES

Watch and Share the Teaser: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kmKwo9qdSI

Created by Dean Devlin, “The Ark” takes place 100 years in the future when planetary colonization missions have begun as a necessity to help secure the survival of the human race. The first of these missions on a spacecraft known as Ark One encounters a catastrophic event causing massive destruction and loss of life. With more than a year left to go before reaching their target planet, a lack of life-sustaining supplies and loss of leadership, the remaining crew must become the best versions of themselves to stay on course and survive.

The series stars Christie Burke, Richard Fleeshman, Reece Ritchie, Stacey Read and Ryan Adams.

Dean Devlin (“Independence Day,” “Stargate”) and Jonathan Glassner (“Stargate SG-1”) are co-showrunners and executive producers alongside Marc Roskin and Rachel Olschan-Wilson of Electric Entertainment. Jonathan English of Balkanic Media and Steve Lee serve as producers.

Christie Burke

Lt. Sharon Garnet, “The Ark”

THE ARK -- Season:1 -- Pictured: Christie Burke as Lt. Sharon Garnet -- (Photo by: Aleksandar Letic/Ark TV Holdings, Inc./SYFY)

Christie Burke plays Lt. Sharon Garnet in the new SYFY original series, “The Ark.”

Christie Burke’s recent television credits include recurring roles on Netflix’s “Maid,” Netflix’s “The Haunting of Bly Manor” and CBC’s “Strange Empire.” Guest star credits include the CW’s “Two Sentence Horror Stories” and “Supernatural.” Burke can be seen in the upcoming EPIX series “Billy the Kid.”

Richard Fleeshman

Lt. James Brice, “The Ark”

THE ARK -- Season:1 -- Pictured: Richard Fleeshman as Lt. James Brice -- (Photo by: Aleksandar Letic/Ark TV Holdings, Inc./SYFY)

Richard Fleeshman plays Lt. James Brice in the new SYFY original series, “The Ark.”

Richard Fleeshman can currently be seen in the wrestling comedy “Deep Heat” (ITV). He has also recently finished filming series such as “Chivalry,” opposite Steve Coogan (Channel 4/ Baby Cow), Neil Gayman’s “The Sandman” (Netflix) and “Four Weddings and a Funeral” (Hulu). On the film side, Fleeshman appears in “A Christmas Number One” (Sky TV), and will be featured in “R.I.P.D.2” (1440 Productions). Fleeshman has also starred in a number of theatrical productions on both Broadway and the West End and was nominated for an Olivier Award for his performance in the West End revival of “Company.”

Reece Ritchie

Lt. Spencer Lane, “The Ark”

THE ARK -- Season:1 -- Pictured: Reece Ritchie as Lt. Spencer Lane -- (Photo by: Aleksandar Letic/Ark TV Holdings, Inc./SYFY)

Reece Ritchie plays Lt. Spencer Lane in the new SYFY original series, “The Ark.”

Reece Ritche’s most recent television work includes his role in the CW series “The Outpost.” He made his film debut in Roland Emmerich’s fantasy/drama “10,000 BC.” Other film roles include “Desert Dancer,” “Hercules,” “Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time” and “The Lovely Bones” directed by multi-award-winning director Peter Jackson. On the stage, Ritchie performed alongside Dame Judy Dench in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” directed by Sir Peter Hall at the Rose Theatre in Kingston.

Stacey Read

Alicia Nevins, “The Ark”

THE ARK -- Season:1 -- Pictured: Stacey Read as Alicia Nevins -- (Photo by: Aleksandar Letic/Ark TV Holdings, Inc./SYFY)

Stacey Read plays Alicia Nevins in the new SYFY original series, “The Ark.”

Stacey Read was born and grew up in Zimbabwe, the daughter of a Zimbabwean mother and British father. She first started acting in her Senior School drama club and it was there performing in school plays that she found passion. She soon came to the UK to train at Performance Preparation Academy.

Ryan Adams

Angus Medford, “The Ark”

THE ARK -- Season:1 -- Pictured: Ryan Adams as Angus Medford -- (Photo by: Aleksandar Letic/Ark TV Holdings, Inc./SYFY)

Ryan Adams plays Angus Medford in the new SYFY original series, “The Ark.”

Ryan Adams graduated from ArtsEd in 2021 with a BA in acting. His theater credits include “All the Things” and “Dan in Totally Over You” at Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation Theatre, and “Ren in Footloose” and “Billy Casper in Kes” at Bury St Edmunds Theatre Royal.” He has had previous roles in short films, including “Orange Peel,” “Exposure” and “Asking Price.”

Christina Wolfe

Cat Brandice, “The Ark”

Christina Wolfe plays Cat Brandice in the new SYFY original series “The Ark.”

Christina Wolfe plays Cat Brandice in the new SYFY original series “The Ark.”

Wolfe can now be seen opposite Leighton Meester in feature film A “Weekend Away” on Netflix. Other credits include “Batwoman,” “The Royals,” the Idris Elba-directed “King for a Term” and “Very Valentine.”

Shalini Peiris

Dr. Sanjivni Kabir, “The Ark”

Shalini Peiris plays Dr. Sanjivni Kabir in the new SYFY original series “The Ark.”

Shalini Peiris plays Dr. Sanjivni Kabir in the new SYFY original series “The Ark.”

Peiris’ recent screen credits include “Good Karma Hospital,” “Zack Snyder’s Justice League” and “Vera.” She’s also an established stage actress on the UK theatre scene with credits that include “Hobson’s Choice” at the Royal Exchange Theatre, “The Duchess of Malfi” at the Almeida Theatre and “Lions and Tigers” at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre.

Dean Devlin

Creator/Executive Producer/Co-Showrunner, “The Ark”

Dean Devlin is the creator, co-showrunner and an executive producer on the new SYFY series “The Ark.”

Devlin has produced and co-written some of the most successful films of all time – “Independence Day,” “Stargate” and “Godzilla” – that collectively grossed more than $41.4 billion worldwide. In 2001, he founded Electric Entertainment where he serves as chairman and CEO. The full-service film, television and worldwide sales and distribution company also houses Electric Post, a state-of-the-art digital effect and postproduction facility.

Electric is rapidly expanding under Devlin’s leadership. The company recently launched its OTT linear channel, ElectricNOW, which is a one-stop shop for fans to enjoy all their favorite shows free, and is also available in a 24/7 live streaming broadcast. ElectricNOW hosts Electric’s newly launched podcast network, Electric Surge, and is available on numerous platforms, including the Roku Channel, Vizio, Fire TV, Plex, STIRR, Local Now, Sling TV, Tivo Plus, IMDB TV and XUMO.

Electric Entertainment is currently in production with several highly anticipated films and TV series. Devlin recently served as executive producer, writer, and director on the reboot of “Leverage” and “Leverage: Redemption,” which is now streaming on Amazon’s Freevee. He also serves as co-showrunner, co-creator and writer for “Almost Paradise,” starring Christian Kane, which is currently available on Freevee. He’s also executive producer of “The Outpost,” which aired its fourth season on The CW in 2021.

Devlin executive produced five seasons of the TNT series “Leverage” and three “The Librarian” movies of the week for the cabler. That led to four seasons of “The Librarians” series that starred Noah Wyle, Rebecca Romijn and John Larroquette.

Devlin directed and produced “Bad Samaritan,” which stars David Tennant, and was released on 2,000 screens through Electric’s distribution arm. Also, under the Electric banner, Devlin produced the upcoming full-length feature “The Deal,” the dystopian drama directed by Orsi Nagypál.

Prior to forming Electric Entertainment, Devlin produced the Mel Gibson drama “The Patriot,” which was nominated for three Academy Awards and earned Gibson a People’s Choice Award for Best Actor.

Jonathan Glassner

Executive Producer/Co-Showrunner, “The Ark”

Jonathan Glassner is the co-showrunner and an executive producer on the new SYFY series “The Ark.”

Glassner is best known for writing, producing and directing “Stargate SG-1,” which ran for 10 seasons. Prior to that, he was showrunner on “The Outer Limits.”

Following “Stargate SG-1,” Glassner moved on to work as a co-executive producer, writer and director for “CSI: Miami” and as a director for “CSI: NY.”

Other credits include “Standoff,” “Covert Affairs,” “Falling Skies” and “The Outpost.”

A graduate of Northwestern University, Glassner has accumulated more than 450 hours of television as either a writer, producer or director.

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THE ARK -- “Everyone Wanted to Be on This Ship” Episode 101 -- Pictured: Christina Wolfe as Cat Brandice -- (Photo by: Aleksandar Letic/Ark TV Holdings, Inc./SYFY)

Interview with Jacob Batalon, Savannah Basley, Mandela Van Peebles and Em Haine

TV Interview!

COMIC-CON INTERNATIONAL: SAN DIEGO 2022 -- “Syfy’s “Reginald the Vampire” Panel” -- Pictured: (l-r) Jacob Batalon, Mandela Van Peebles, Em Haine, Savannah Basley -- (Photo by: Todd Williamson/Peacock)

Interview with Jacob Batalon, Savannah Basley, Mandela Van Peebles and Em Haine of “Reginald the Vampire” on Syfy by Suzanne 9/15

NBC UNIVERSAL 2022 TCA PRESS TOUR
SYFY REGINALD THE VAMPIRE
Savannah Basley, Talent
Jacob Batalon, Talent
Em Haine, Talent
Mandela Van Peebles, Talent
Jeremiah Chechik, Executive Producer
Lindsay Macadam, Executive Producer
Harley Peyton, Showrunner/Executive Producer
Virtual via Zoom September 15, 2022
© 2022 NBC Universal. All rights reserved.

SHOW INTRODUCTION: Hello, and welcome to our panel for the new SYFY series “Reginald the Vampire.” The hour long series, which stars Jacob Batalon as the title character, will premiere on SYFY on Wednesday, October 5th at 10:00 p.m., following the Season 2 premiere of “Chucky.” Imagine a world populated by beautiful, fit, and vain vampires. Reginald Andres tumbles headlong into it as an unlikely hero who will have to navigate every kind of obstacle: the girl he loves, but can’t be with, a bully manager at work, and the vampire chieftain who wants him dead. Fortunately, Reginald discovers just a few unrecognized powers of his own. A new show with a lot of heart and just enough blood, “Reginald the Vampire” prove the end of life is just as complicated as life itself.

This was a great TCA panel about the show. I really enjoyed the episodes I watched, and you will, too. I told them this and jokingly thanked them for getting a certain earworm song they used in the show stuck in my head. Peyton replied that it’s stuck in all of their heads, too.

Savannah Basley plays the “evil” ancient vampire, Angela. Mandela Van Peebles (son of Mario Van Peebles!) plays Maurice, the vampire who turns Reginald. There is a very sexy scene in the show between them, so I asked them about what they had to go through as actors to do that scene, which was sexy but involved lots of blood. Savannah had already mentioned that there was lots of “stickiness.”

Savannah explained that it was fun and that she loves the horror genre. She loves being hands-on and said that being covered in blood and having it “squirting” was fun. She admitted that while there is a vain part of you that worries about how your hair and makeup look, you can let go of all that and have the freedom to wallow in the fake blood and just concentrate on acting in the scene. She did add that the stickiness was kind of annoying, but the rest was “a lot of fun.”

Mandela also answered that having EP Jeremiah Chechik and the other “great people behind the camera and being able to trust their vision” was the best part for him. He wants to look good in a sex scene and can be critical of himself. He also spoke at length about how the romance between Maurice and Angela spans many years, so the earlier sex scenes have more innocence, whereas the later ones have more confidence and “the strength of someone who has grown up a bit since the first time.” He agrees with Savannah that it’s fun and figures that when you’re immortal (like the vampires are), it would be difficult to keep holding a grudge (as Angela and Maurice do against each other). He enjoyed playing their relationship and is looking forward to seeing it on screen. Jeremiah also chimed in to compare these type of scenes with others he’s done in the past. He admits that “they can be very disquieting, can be very tense, and can be very uncomfortable.” However, they weren’t for these actors. He works hard to make sure that all of the actors “feel very comfortable and relaxed” and not “self conscious.”

He praised the actors for how they made the scenes fun. Savannah also replied that there was “safety on set.” They made sure that she and Mandela were comfortable, ready and feeling okay. They worked with an “intimacy coordinators,” which made them feel less vulnerable. She felt it was important to show Angela’s softer side, since she’s seen as angry or evil, so that we can see why Maurice fell in love with her. She might have put a wall up due to things that have happened in her 400-year lifetime.

Showrunner Harley joked, “She might pull your heart out of your chest, but other than that, she’s very, very soft inside.” Everyone laughed at that. There was quite a lot of laughing and joking around during the whole panel, which was very fun.

Most of the press questions were for Jacob, who’s not only the star of the show but famous for his role as Ned in the Spider-Man movies. He was asked about having to play a vampire. He praised Harley and the others for making the show as realistic as possible and turning the usual vampire “tropes” on their heads – especially the ones about vampires only being thin and beautiful. He jokingly added that the vampire blood gets everywhere, including in some “bad crevices.” He enjoys being the hero of the story, even though he’s not tall, thin or has “long, flowing hair.” He did have a hard time speaking, at first, because of the fangs, and tried to speak without a lisp on the first day of shooting.

He was also asked about how different it is being the lead in a TV show (after playing Spider-Man’s best friend). He answered that he just tries to make sure that everyone gets along well and enjoys their time on the set. He feels very fortunate that everyone he works with is “so great and so amazing and talented and sweet and willing to work.” He added that it shocked him how much you have to come to work prepared (he may have been joking here, but I’m not sure). He feels that working on the movies led to this way of thinking.

Harley praised Jacob because he wasn’t used to shooting 8 or 9 pages per day, and he was worried that he might burn out, but he is a “superstar.” He said that everyone in the cast is like that. He thinks they’re very lucky to have such a great cast and that is “such a key thing to a successful show.” He mentioned that Jacob is a real leader in the cast and that he never remembers him even having a bad day. Jeremiah added that Jacob was always completely prepared and ready; he set the tone for everyone else. Jacob modestly thanked them for being there for him. Then he joked, “but I am, like, on the title of the show, but whatever. It’s fine” which provoked more laughter.

Jacob was also asked about the trials his character is forced to go through, but he wasn’t sure what he could say without giving away any spoilers. Harley mentioned some difficult arcade games. Jacob said that the “vampire karaoke” was difficult for him (there is a great karaoke scene in the show, although it’s not part of his trials). This is where Savannah said that working with the sticky blood was difficult and got everywhere, which Jacob agreed with. Jeremiah concurred that they did use an awful lot of red liquid, but the cast “all kind of sublimated to that and drank deeply.”

Harley and the other producers were asked whether any particular vampire show or movie from the past inspired them. He acknowledged that it’s hard to forget about “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and “Angel,” but they mostly used the “Fat Vampire” books in which the series is based. They made many changes to that and “ended up with a kind of rom com workplace comedy drama.” Jeremiah also weighed in on how past vampire shows and movies inspired them, along with the book, to overturn all of the normal vampire clichés.

The cast were all asked about their favorite things about their characters. Savannah loves how Angela is strong, powerful smart and “claims this full autonomy over herself.” Em pointed out that Sarah is very real, since she isn’t playing a vampire. Sarah is “the grounded center” and she feels that she was able to grow along with the character as she tried to “find her place in the world.” Mandela enjoyed getting to do new things, such as playing a vampire. He tried to channel his granddad and great-grandad, since he was playing someone that’s lived a long time. He tried to bring “different generational traits to a modern character.” It was fun for him to do that as well as playing in a more diverse vampire universe. Jacob described how Reginald is very “thoughtful” and “enigmatic,” and he’s “uncertain about life” and yet aware of how people see him now in this situation (as a “fat vampire”). He used this big change in his life to become a better person. He also thinks that the other characters really affect Reginald’s life deeply. He really loves playing with all of that.

Everyone was asked what other creatures they would like to see on the show. Harley said in a mysterious way that they all would love to see “an angel with a flaming sword.” Jacob likes dragons, and Em agreed, but Harley said that he doesn’t think they could afford dragons. Jacob would also love to see a “vampire battle.” Jeremiah said that they could have just about any type of fantastical creature, since they have vampires. Savannah loves mythology and would love to see a wendigo. Someone else mentioned a Chupacabra. Em joked that she’d like to see a jackalope. Harley agreed that it would be “more appropriate” for their show and “that’s definitely affordable for our special effects.” Savannah asked if Angela could have a pet jackalope. Harley said that he had really wanted to have Mandela and Nikki holding puppies, but they weren’t able to make it happen (that may have been a joke). Em talked about how much fun their show is, that they can be absurd. She commented, “I love that. I love that shit.”

They were asked how their show will stand out from all of the other vampire series currently on the air or coming up. Harley pointed out that most of the shows are not humorous (aside from “What We Do in the Shadows”). He thinks that their source material created a certain type of tone where they have an “interesting dichotomy between the vampire world, where vampires are really vapid, vain, runway models” and they use that to address the issues of “body shaming and body positivity” where Reginald doesn’t fit into that same type, which is different from other shows. They get into how the vampires “love bureaucracy” and are very vain. He discussed the conflict in the vampires between what they see when they look in the mirror (which they do a lot) and whether their inner beauty matches up.

Executive Producers Harley Petyon and Jeremiah Chechik of "Reginald the Vampire" on Syfy

Jeremiah said eloquently that their show is “very rooted in real emotional dynamics. That is the rock solid foundation, and it’s based on how we fit in, how we present ourselves, what we think of ourselves, how we relate to others, what is expected of us, our sexual orientation…the color of our skin. All of these things are really social dynamics which we explore within the wrapping of a vampire show.” Their show is more about those aspects rather than sucking people’s blood. It’s about how you can improve your life after you die. He also mentioned that their show stands out both “tonally and visually” from other vampire shows. It’s not as dark. Lindsay put in her two cents that their show has a different heart than the other shows. It’s really more of “an underdog story” with a “positive message that’s baked into all the entertainment and comedy. So it’s very aspirational, and it’s just so much fun.” She also said that the other shows don’t have their talented cast. Jacob agreed that their show is more about “the human condition” and the journey of self that Reginald goes through, and “the connections he has through death.” He concluded that Reginald “learns life through death, and that’s a very poignant and deeper sort of meaning than just, like, wanting to kill people and look super hot.” Jeremiah informed us that Syfy ordered the show because it’s original; there is nothing else like it on TV.

Mandela was asked to comment on a story his father (Mario Van Peebles) told about how his grandfather (Melvin Van Peebles) wouldn’t help him when he wanted to become an actor because he wanted him to do it on his own. He asked if that’s the way it was with him as well. Mandela answered that he went to college, and then when he tried to get a “real job,” it didn’t work out. He found it very hard. He remembered how much fun it was when he was a kid, traveling all over the world with his dad to different places (for filming). He figured that working on a set was a lot more comfortable for him than working in an office. Once he decided to go for that, it worked out. He’s very excited to be doing the show. He didn’t really answer the question, but that’s fine.

Jeremiah joked, “I’d stick with this for a while.” The reporter asked Mandela what type of regular job he had been looking for, so Mandela answered that he made smoothies at a health food store, “Simply Wholesome.” I thought he was joking at the time (since Reginald and his friends make smoothies), but maybe he wasn’t. It was hard to tell in this panel because there was a lot of deadpan joking.

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Ad for "Reginald the Vampire"

Reginald the Vampire

Premieres Wednesday, October 5, at 10 PM ET/PT on SYFY

Trailer

Imagine a world populated by beautiful, fit and vain vampires. Reginald Andres tumbles headlong into it as an unlikely hero who will have to navigate every kind of obstacle – the girl he loves but can’t be with, a bully manager at work and the vampire chieftain who wants him dead. Fortunately, Reginald discovers he has a few unrecognized powers of his own. A new show with a lot of heart and just enough blood, “Reginald the Vampire” proves the undead life is just as complicated as life itself.

“Reginald the Vampire” is produced by Great Pacific Media Inc., Modern Story Company, December Films and Cineflix Studios and executive produced by Harley Peyton, Jeremiah Chechik, Todd Berger, Lindsay Macadam, Brett Burlock and Peter Emerson. The series is based on the book series by Johnny B. Truant.

Jacob Batalon

Reginald Andres, “Reginald the Vampire”

Jacob Batalon plays Reginald Andres in the new SYFY series “Reginald the Vampire,” which premieres Oct. 5 at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

Batalon is best known for his role as Peter Parker’s charming best friend Ned Leeds in the “Spider-Man” films starring Tom Holland, including the most recent box office smash “Spider-Man: No Way Home.” He’s also appeared in “Avengers: Infinity War” and “Avengers: Endgame” as well as several indie films.

Upcoming projects include the films “Horrorscope” as well as Netflix’s “Lift,” alongside Kevin Hart.

Born and raised in Honolulu to Filipino parents, Batalon attended a two-year acting program at the New York Conservatory for Dramatic Arts. While working through his last year in the program, he sent in a self-tape submission for a vague supporting role in a Marvel movie, his first audition ever, which led to being cast in the “Spider-Man” films.

Savannah Basley

Angela Hibbert, “Reginald the Vampire”

Savannah Basley plays Angela Hibbert in the new SYFY series “Reginald the Vampire,” which premieres Oct. 5 at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

Basley’s first TV role was in “The Art of More and she has subsequently appeared in multiple series, including “Tales from the Hood,” “Coroner,” “Utopia Falls” and “Wynonna Earp.” She’ll soon return for the second season of “SurrealEstate.”

Her first film role was in the 2015 short “White Lock,” which won the Special Jury Prize at the Amsterdam Film Festival.

Basley is a dual Canadian-US citizen, the daughter of a Canadian mom and an American military veteran.

Em Haine

Sarah Kinney, “Reginald the Vampire”

Em Haine plays Sarah Kinney in the new SYFY series “Reginald the Vampire,” which premieres Oct. 5 at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

Born in Vancouver, B.C., Haine is the only child of an Austrian father and French-Canadian mother. They eventually moved to London to study the Meisner technique at the Actors Temple. While in both New York and Los Angeles, Haine took up Improv at the Upright Citizens Brigade.

Haine’s first break came with the role of oddball Noreen Vanderslice in the critically acclaimed miniseries “Fargo.” Other TV credits include “Chilling Adventures of Sabrina” and “The Mighty Ducks: Game Changers.”

On the film side, Haine has appeared in “Deadpool,” “Tully” and the indie “Gregoire.”

Mandela Van Peebles

Maurice Miller, “Reginald the Vampire”

Mandela Van Peebles will play Maurice Miller on the new SYFY series “Reginald the Vampire,” which premieres Oct. 5 at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

Van Peebles most recently recurred on Taylor Sheridan’s drama series “The Mayor of Kingstown.” He recently guest starred on season 2 of “Wu-Tang: An American Saga” and appeared in the biopic “Salt N Pepa.”

Past film work includes a starring role in “Jigsaw,” the latest installment of the “Saw” franchise, and USS Indianapolis: Men of Courage.”

Other television work includes the 2016 Emmy Award-nominated miniseries “Roots.”

Harley Peyton

Executive Producer, “Reginald the Vampire”

Harley Peyton is an executive producer and showrunner on the new SYFY series “Reginald the Vampire,” which premieres Oct. 5 at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

Peyton was born and raised in Spokane, Wash., and attended Harvard and Stanford universities as well as the California Institute of the Arts.

On the TV front, Peyton has served as a writer and/or producer on “Twin Peaks,” “Moon Over Miami,” “Route 66,” “Dracula,” “Wedding Band,” “Reign,” “Dominion,” “Channel Zero” “Project Blue Book” and, most recently, “Chucky.”

On the film side, his credits include “Less Than Zero,” “Gold Coast,” “Heaven’s Prisoners,” “Bandits” and “Friends With Benefits.”

Jeremiah Chechik

Executive Producer/Director, “Reginald the Vampire”

Jeremiah Chechik is an executive producer and director for the new SYFY series “Reginald the Vampire,” which premieres Oct. 5 at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

Chechik is an award-winning director who has worked in commercials, studio and independent film and domestic and international television for three decades. Among his several feature credits are “Christmas Vacation” and “Benny and Joon.”

In television, he has worked for all the major studios and/or networks and has directed pilots, produced miniseries and worked in every possible genre. Among his credits are “The Bronx Is Burning,” “Gossip Girl,” “Burn Notice,” “Helix,” “Criminal Minds,” “Chuck,” “Shadowhunters,” “Rogue,” “The Gifted” and many others.

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REGINALD THE VAMPIRE -- “Dead Weight” Episode 101 -- Pictured: (l-r) Mandela Van Peebles as Maurice, Jacob Batalon as Reginald -- (Photo by: James Dittiger/SYFY)

 

Interview with “Resident Alien” actors and showrunner

TV Interview!

Chris Sheridan, Alan Tudyk, Alice Wetterlund, Levi Fiehler, Corey Reynolds, and Elizabeth Bowen

Interview with showrunner Chris Sheridan and actors Alan Tudyk, Alice Wetterlund, Levi Fiehler, Corey Reynolds, and Elizabeth Bowen of “Resident Alien” on Syfy by Suzanne 8/8/22

This was from a fun press day to promote the return of the show for the second half of season 2. First there was a TCA panel (Television Critics of America) where all of these actors plus star Sara Tomko (Asta) answered some questions. Then we had 3 junkets with the other actors and Chris Sheridan. You’ll see videos of those below.

During the TCA panel, we saw this excellent trailer that you should watch as it reminds us where we left off back in March!  They also announced, for those of us who hadn’t heard, that the show was renewed for season 3 “due to its incredibly passionate fan base!”  So, yay, fans!  Below are the highlights from the TCA panel.

Showrunner/creator/writer Chris Sheridan shared that they do allow for a lot of improv on the show. He was asked specifically about Harry’s alien language.  Most of that is all Alan Tudyk’s doing. Alan also joked that at the recent San Diego Comic-Con, they expected him to speak in the alien language at the drop of a hat, which he wasn’t prepared to do. He promised that he will learn to do that before the next con, though.

Sara was asked about what her character goes through this season. She replied that they had a lot of scripts to shoot in a very short time (and more than last season), but Chris lets them know ahead of time what their characters will be experiencing, so they can prepare a little better. She spoke quite a bit about being the only person in the main cast that’s not a comedian. She enjoys reacting to them, and laughing at their jokes, but she’s not funny like they are. There’s a point in one of the upcoming episodes where Asta is very happy because of an alien thing that happens to her, and it took Sara a bit to wrap her head around that because Asta is normally not very happy, so she had to talk to Chris to get an idea about what she should be like. She concluded, “I just really tried to make it as organic and truthful in the moment.”   Later in the panel, when the cast were all asked if they ever felt like an alien, she shared that she felt a bit like one, being the more serious person amidst all the comics.

The actors were asked what they learned from their characters. Alice was almost the only one to take the question seriously. She analyzed D’arcy, saying that she’s “self-absorbed” and doesn’t realize how her actions not only hurt herself but others around her.  She’s starting to understand that, and she thinks it’s good to keep that in mind. Elizabeth also said that she’s learned that “listening and observing will teach you a lot more than talking.” That’s very true! I need to learn that, too.

Alan joked that he learned that he loves pizza, but then he explained that he has a lot of food allergies, so they made him special pizza that he could eat. That was very cool to learn because I have that, too. I hope he can learn to make his own pizza or can find some other people to make them for him. At the mention of food, Sara added that she doesn’t like it when actors don’t eat on the set when there’s food there. She has to eat food if it’s in front of her.  Levi and Sarah both agreed that they hate tight jeans. Levi has had to wear a lot of those as his character.

Alan was asked whether he’s content to be doing so much scifi.  Alan reflected for a moment and then said with a laugh that he’s happy. He enjoys all the work he gets. He noted that he did a play in L.A. right before season 2, which he really enjoyed (doing live stage), but the great thing about playing Harry or doing any scifi is that you get to do all sorts of unusual things that you wouldn’t normally get to do. He mused that you can do everything, all in one. “There can be physical comedy, which you rarely ever get to do in television or in film, and it can also be very touching and have very intimate moments.” He went on to talk about how much he enjoyed working with the dog and the kids on the show. He said that the dog is very smart and a good boy.

Then they were all asked the question about feeling like an alien. Alan related it to being invited to a party that you really don’t want to go to, but you have to go and pretend to be having a good time. Corey shared that he has anxiety, so anything social like that makes him feel anxious.  Then Alice did this hilarious riff where she pretended to be a stuck-up socialite going into JC Penney’s for the first time.

Chris was asked about the third season, so he told us that it would be 12 episodes, which he’s already started working on.  It won’t be split up into two parts like season 2 was, and there will be one arc for the whole season. He explained a little bit about how the show was developed. First he envisioned it as 10 episodes per season, going 4 or 5 seasons. Then they had 16 episodes for season 2, which changed things. He added that these shows are “organic beasts” that change a lot, anyway. He explained, “things that you weren’t sure were going to work work really well. Things you thought were going to work don’t work well at all” so you constantly have to adjust for these changes. The show is “constantly evolving.”  He also said that the chemistry of the actors gives you more ideas about how to change the story.

He also spoke a bit about Asta and Harry’s emotional growth this season, which you’ll see more of in the upcoming episodes. Asta has to deal with the fact that she shot and killed someone, and Harry is dealing with the fact that he almost died.

Alan was also asked a semi-serious question about he and Nathan Fillion guest-starring on each other’s shows. Alan replied that it was just their friendship. He joked, “I was never on [an episode of] “Castle,” so I’ve got a lot of making up to do.”

The cast was also asked about whether they were worried when there was a big break in the middle of season 2. They were all fine with it, but some fans were worried and impatient.

The trailer revealed that we’ll see more of Terry O’Quinn’s character. Also, there’s a new detective that joins the show named Lena Torres, played by Nicola Correia-Damude.

Here are the videos from the junket. We all laughed a lot, so I’m sure you will, too.

 

 

 

MORE INFO: Another Trailer

"Resident Alien" poster

Based on the Dark Horse comics, SYFY’s “Resident Alien” follows a crash-landed alien named Harry (Alan Tudyk) whose secret mission is to kill all humans. In season two, Harry is once again stranded on Earth where he must confront the consequences of having failed his people’s mission to destroy the human race. The second half of Season 2 picks up in the immediate aftermath of the shocking action Asta (Sara Tomko) took to save Harry’s life. They must deal with the emotional fallout of the night all while searching for the alien baby – a search that leads to big realizations for each of them. Meanwhile, Sheriff Mike (Corey Reynolds) and Deputy Liv (Elizabeth Bowen) solve a big case, Ben (Levi Fiehler) attempts to sell Patience on a new resort, and D’arcy (Alice Wetterlund) fights the challenge of a lifetime. The series also stars Judah Prehn.

From UCP, a division of Universal Studio Group, in association with Amblin TV and Dark Horse Entertainment, “Resident Alien” was adapted to television by executive producer Chris Sheridan. Mike Richardson and Keith Goldberg of Dark Horse Entertainment, Justin Falvey and Darryl Frank of Amblin TV, Robert Duncan McNeill, Christian Taylor and Nastaran Dibai also executive produce.

Alan Tudyk

Harry Vanderspeigle, “Resident Alien”; Devil, “Devil May Care”

Alan Tudyk stars in the SYFY drama “Resident Alien” as Harry Vanderspeigle, an alien who crash lands onto Earth and must pass himself off as a small-town human doctor.

He also recently voiced the role of Devil in “Devil May Care,” which also aired on SYFY. In addition, Tudyk voices the maniacal Joker in DC Universe’s “Harley Quinn” animated series on HBO Max. Tudyk also voiced Tuk-Tuk in the Oscar-nominated film “Raya and the Last Dragon” as well as Pico the Toucan in Disney’s hit film “Encanto.”

In 2016, Tudyk appeared in Lucasfilm’s “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” as the scene-stealing security droid, ‘K-2SO.’ Directed by Gareth Edwards, the film grossed over $1 billion at the global box office and was the first live action Star Wars spin-off. He also voiced characters in two Academy-Award nominated animated films, playing the ‘Duke of Weaselton’ in Disney’s “Zootopia” and the rooster ‘Hei Hei’ in Disney’s “Moana.”

Tudyk is also the creator, executive producer and star of the Emmy nominated series “Con Man,” which was funded via Indiegogo with a record-breaking $3.2 million donation from over 46,000 fans. “Con Man” debuted at Lionsgate’s Comic Con HQ in 2015 and later aired on SYFY. Loosely based on Tudyk and Nathan Fillion’s experiences starring in “Firefly,” “Con Man” centered on the post-show life of ‘Wray Nerely’ (Tudyk) after “Spectrum,” a sci-fi TV series canceled before its time that later became a cult classic. In 2016, Tudyk, along with Fillion, also launched “Con Man: The Game” based on the series which allowed players to build and host their own comic book conventions.

Tudyk has shown audiences wide versatility in numerous television shows and a plethora of feature films. Recently, he co-starred in the Jay Roach 2015 SAG Award nominated feature “Trumbo,” opposite Bryan Cranston, Diane Lane, Helen Mirren and John Goodman as well as 2014’s “Welcome to Me” with Kristin Wiig. In 2013, Tudyk co-starred in the well-received Jackie Robinson biopic, “42,” opposite Chadwick Boseman as former Philadelphia Phillies manager ‘Ben Chapman.’ He made his feature film debut in 1998, when he first appeared opposite Robin Williams in “Patch Adams.”

Tudyk’s role in the Disney animated feature, “Wreck-It Ralph,” garnered him an Annie Award for his role as ‘King Candy.” He can also be heard in its sequel, “Ralph Breaks the Internet” as ‘KnowsMore.” Tudyk has also loaned his voice to ‘The Duke of Weaselton’ in Disney’s Academy Award-winning film “Frozen,” ‘Alister Krei’ in “Big Hero 6” and ‘Ludo’ and ‘King Butterfly’ on the Disney Channel series, “Star vs. the Forces of Evil.”

His additional film credits also include: “28 Days,” “A Knight’s Tale,” “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story,” “Death at a Funeral” (the original UK version), “Knocked Up,” “Tucker and Dale vs Evil,” “3:10 to Yuma,” “Serenity,” “Premature,” “Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter” and “Transformers 3.” Additionally, Tudyk motion performed the lead robot, ‘Sonny,’ in “I, Robot” opposite Will Smith.

In television, Tudyk can currently be seen in DC Universe’s “Doom Patrol” and season three of Netflix’s “Santa Clarita Diet.” He was a series regular on the critically acclaimed ABC comedy, “Suburgatory” as well as on NBC’s workplace comedy “Powerless” and BBC America’s “Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency. His work on Joss Whedon’s “Firefly,” has been highly lauded by fans and has gained him a strong cult following. Tudyk also appeared in “Strangers with Candy,” “Dollhouse,” “Frasier,” “Justified” and “Arrested Development.” He also was the host of “Newsreaders,” written and produced by Rob Corddry and David Wain, on Adult Swim.

Tudyk attended the prestigious Juilliard School in New York and has starred on Broadway opposite Kristin Chenoweth in “Epic Proportions,” played ‘Lancelot’ with the original cast in Monty Python’s “Spamalot,” as well as the lead role of ‘Peter’ in “Prelude to a Kiss” opposite John Mahoney.

Tudyk grew up in Plano, Texas and currently resides in Los Angeles with his wife.

He is represented by The Coronel Group and Gersh.

Chris Sheridan

Executive Producer, “Resident Alien”

Chris Sheridan serves as executive producer of SYFY’s “Resident Alien.”

Five-time Emmy nominee and BAFTA nominee, Sheridan has been a television writer and producer for 26 years. He has produced more than 400 episodes of television, including 17 seasons on the Fox Network animated hit, “Family Guy” where he acted as co-showrunner from 2004 to 2009. He remains a consulting producer on “Family Guy,” and has a feature film in development with Josephson Entertainment.

Corey Reynolds

Sheriff Mike Thompson, “Resident Alien”

Corey Reynolds stars in the SYFY drama “Resident Alien” as Mike Thompson, the local sheriff who runs the town with a chip on his shoulder, a cowboy hat on his head and an iron fist.

Reynolds is best known for his role on “The Closer,” which he starred on for six seasons. He will next be seen as a guest star in Apple’s “The Afterparty.” He’s recurred on “All American,” “Red Line,” “Criminal Minds,” “NCIS: Los Angeles,” “Masters of Sex” and “Murder in the First.” He has guest starred on “Seal Team” and “Chicago P.D.”

On the film side, he was last seen on screen in “Straight Outta Compton” and also appeared in “Selma,” opposite David Oyelowo and Common.

Reynolds was nominated for a Tony Award for his performance in Broadway’s production of “Hairspray.”

Alice Wetterlund

D’Arcy Bloom, “Resident Alien”

Alice Wetterlund stars in SYFY’s “Resident Alien” as “D’Arcy Bloom,” the charismatic bartender at the local pub who, as a former Olympic snowboarder, is also a part of the avalanche control team.

Wetterlund has performed her non-yelling brand of comedy nationally at colleges, clubs, and festivals such as Just for Laughs, Bridgetown, Moon Tower, Women in Comedy, SF Sketchfest, RIOT LA, Bonnaroo and more.

She is known for her character “Carla” on HBO’s “Silicon Valley” and played “Kelly Grady” on TBS’ “People of Earth.” She can also be seen in the movie “Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates” as “Cousin Terry.” She has performed her stand up on “Conan” and currently co-hosts the popular podcast “Treks and the City” with Veronica Osorio. She recently wrapped “Search & Destroy” for Hulu, produced by Carrie Brownstein. Wetterlund can currently be seen on the latest season of Netflix’s “Glow.” Her hourlong stand-up special premiered on Amazon in August.

Elizabeth Bowen

Deputy Liv Baker, “Resident Alien”

Elizabeth Bowen plays Deputy Liv Baker on the hit SYFY series “Resident Alien.”

Bowen was raised on Vancouver Island in Nanaimo, British Columbia. She attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts – West before moving back to Canada to work on improv comedy while pursuing film and television roles.

Bowen credits her role in season two of FX’s “Fargo” as a career turning point. Bowen’s other credits include recurring roles on Amazon’s “Upload” and Hulu’s “Woke,” as well as the Freeform holiday movie “Angry Angel.”

She is based in Vancouver, B.C.

Levi Fiehler

Mayor Ben Hawthorne, “Resident Alien”

Levi Fiehler stars in the SYFY drama “Resident Alien” as Ben Hawthorne, the naive town mayor whose 8-year-old son is suspicious that the new local doctor is an alien.

Fiehler was born in Juneau, Alaska where he trained as an actor at Perseverance Theatre. His career took off when he booked a lead role on “Fetching,” which was an original series for Michael Eisner’s company, Vuguru. Prior to “Fetching,” Fiehler was a series regular on Ron Howard’s series “Mars” for National Geographic. Other work includes “The Fosters,” “Ray Donovan,” “Murder in the First” and “CSI.”

Sara Tomko

Asta Twelvetrees, “Resident Alien”

Sara Tomko stars in SYFY’s “Resident Alien” as Asta Twelvetrees. Strong and sarcastic, she works with Harry at the town’s health clinic.

Tomko is known for her recurring roles on “Sneaky Pete” and “Once Upon a Time,” as well as her appearances on “The Leftovers” and “The Son.”

She started her career in experimental theatre and musicals in Virginia, later moving to Los Angeles in 2007 to pursue film. Her first independent film roles aired on SYFY, and she is thrilled that her TV career has brought her full circle. She is an actor, singer, producer, poet an artist.

Tomko is represented by Bohemia Group and KMR Talent.

SciFiVision’s interview with Alan Tudyk and Chris Sheridan

Proofread and Edited by Brenda

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Tudyk, Reynolds, Bowen and Correia-Damude

Interview with cast and crew of “Astrid and Lilly Saves the World”

TV Interview!

Syfy panel with actors and producers from "Astrid & Lilly Save the World"

Interview with actors Samantha Aucoin and Jana Morrison, and showrunners Noelle Stehman and Betsy Van Stone of “Astrid and Lilly Save the World” on Syfy by Suzanne 12/9/21

This was a fun panel with the stars and executive producers of this new Syfy show. The show seems to me like “Scooby Doo” crossed with “Supernatural.”

NBCUNIVERSAL VIRTUAL PRESS TOUR SYFY

Astrid & Lilly Save the World

Samantha Aucoin, Talent, “Lilly Fortenberry”, Jana Morrison, Talent, “Astrid Bell”, Noelle Stehman, Executive Producer/Showrunner and Betsy Van Stone, Executive Producer/Showrunner

Virtual via Zoom December 9, 2021

© 2021 NBCUniversal, Inc.  All rights reserved.

HALLE HERMAN: Hi. I’m Halle Herman, and I’m here to introduce the panel for SYFY’s new series “Astrid and Lilly Save the World,” which will premiere Wednesday, January 26th, at 10:00 p.m., on both SYFY and USA Network before airing exclusively on SYFY.

High school is hard enough when you’re different, but when outcast BFFs Astrid and Lilly accidently crack open a portal to a terrifyingly quirky monster dimension, it gets a lot more complicated. It’s up to them to vanquish the creepy creatures and save the world, becoming the badass heroes they were meant to be; that is, if they can survive the horrors of high school.

Here’s a peek at “Astrid and Lilly Save the World.”

From left to right are executive producers Noelle Stehman and Betsy Van Stone and Samantha Aucoin and Jana Morrison. We are now ready for your questions.

MATTHEW LIFSON: Thank you, Halle, and welcome to our panelists.

(Zoom instructions.)

QUESTION: Hey, Noelle and Betsy. I love that these two lead actresses are larger than a typical leading lady. Was that body positivity something you went into creating with these particular roles or did you just stumble on these really good talents and they fit the characters?

BETSY VAN STONE: We went into it very intentionally. You know, the whole world doesn’t look the same. Not everyone is a size two, and representation matters. We are lucky to have found incredibly talented actresses who happen to look like what most American women look like. And it’s long overdue to see that represented on television.

QUESTION: Amen. Thank you, guys, so much. And Samantha and Jana, you guys are beautiful, and I love that you guys get these comedic leads to you. Talk about, for you, what it means to you to see more inclusivity as far as larger lead actresses.

JANA MORRISON: Like, where do we start? It obviously means the world because when we were young, we would have killed to see a show like this.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Yeah.

JANA MORRISON: To have people like us be heroes? Back then it wasn’t a thing and now I’m really stoked that we’re that for people around the world.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Yeah.

JANA MORRISON: Anything you want to say?

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Yeah. No. I mean, that’s so true. I could have 100 percent used this show in high school. And I’m so proud that we get to represent these characters, these amazing characters. And I think it’s really going to make a difference in for anyone who watches the show.

QUESTION: This is for Noelle and Betsy. So much of TV is about people who are perceived of as outsiders; particularly teen shows, a lot are about that. So, I’m just wondering, in your own teen years, when you were kids, were you thought of do you think of yourself as outsiders or were you one of the cool kids or were you in the theater crowd? What were you like at the time?

BETSY VAN STONE: All of the above.

NOELLE STEHMAN: Yeah. I think I hopped through a lot of the different crowds the uncool crowd, a little bit of the theater crowd, a little bit of sometimes in with the cool kids. But, definitely, I think high school’s a time when no one quite feels comfortable no matter what crowd you’re in. And that doesn’t just stop at high school. It kind of extends throughout all of life. So, I think in that way, this is a show that is for everybody of every age, anyone who’s ever felt like an outsider in any type of way, yeah.

QUESTION: Well, let me ask the actresses that too because you’re so near to having been in high school. And like you say, that’s probably the time when you feel like you said, everyone feels like an outsider. So, what were your high school years like? Were you cool kids? Were you outsiders? What did you feel like?

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Yeah. My high school experience, I was definitely part of the theater group and music kids. I kind of hopped from group to group; and because I hopped from group to group, I definitely felt like more of an outsider. I definitely didn’t stick with one set group. So, I can definitely relate to the characters in that way.

JANA MORRISON: For me, my high school, I was definitely theater-kid through and through. All my little group were just theater and dance people and we just all got each other because we were weird and loud. And all the other kids in school thought we were losers for, like, loving theater, which I don’t know why. Theater’s really fun. But I had maybe a couple, like, “cool kid” friends, but I don’t know if they were really my friends. So

QUESTION: Okay. Cool.

BETSY VAN STONE: Yeah. I just want to add quickly that one thing we’ve really learned in writing and making the show and talking to as many people as we have come in contact with, whether they be related to the show or not, like, at some point in your life, you felt like an outsider. That’s just universally true. And you felt like an outcast, whether that was when you were a kid or at work or in your family, and that’s why this show is for everyone. And what’s cooler than two outcasts who save the world? I mean, come on.

NOELLE STEHMAN: Absolutely. And we want to celebrate everyone’s uniqueness and weirdness in all of its glory.

QUESTION: Good point. Thanks a lot.

BETSY VAN STONE: Thank you.

QUESTION: I kind of want to follow up on Mike’s question about the teen subject. Can you talk a little bit I’d like to hear from the producers and then from the talent, please, about the series and maybe what is your most important subject matter that you think will continue to keep teens interested in the show?

NOELLE STEHMAN: I mean, I guess I would say overall it’s just, again, emphasis on the feeling comfortable being yourself, whatever that means.

BETSY VAN STONE: Yeah.

NOELLE STEHMAN: And I feel like that extends to all the different categories of insecurities and vulnerabilities and being different. So, yeah, I think whatever it is that scares you or makes you feel like an outsider, that is to be celebrated, and that’s what we’re trying to emphasize across the board.

I don’t know if you have anything specific to add.

BETSY VAN STONE: Well, yeah, I mean, specific to the teen experience, I think you’re sort of forced in high school into trying to be like everyone else. And when you’re not, you feel somehow like you’re cast aside or

NOELLE STEHMAN: You don’t matter as much.

BETSY VAN STONE: like you don’t matter. And we just want people to watch this show, and I think they’ll be surprised and charmed by these unlikely heroes and will connect to the fact that they are different and they matter the most in the world because they’re the only two girls who can save the world.

QUESTION: Okay. And then the talent, please.

JANA MORRISON: I think it’s going to be really important for teens to hear that whether you think you look like a hero or you act a certain way, you can still be a hero in your own way and in your own community because you don’t have to be in a certain group or look a certain way to be a hero for the people in your life.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Yeah, absolutely, yeah. I mean, appearances aren’t everything, and I think this show really shows you that it doesn’t matter what you look like. And I think people are really going to resonate with that, hopefully, and

(To Jana) I know. We’re going to cry.

no. But, yeah, this really means everything to us to be able to be those characters for people. I think people are really going to resonate with this show. And, like Betsy said, there really is something in it for everyone. So, I think that’s going to keep people watching.

QUESTION: And could the two of you or one of you talk about was there ever a time on the set where reality and fantasy may have coincided?

JANA MORRISON: It’s like that every day.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Yeah.

JANA MORRISON: Because we were living it was like we were living two different lives.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Yeah, yeah.

JANA MORRISON: Kind of, right?

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Totally, totally.

JANA MORRISON: I feel like I know we both feel ourselves in the characters. So, every scene, it felt like it was kind of an Astrid and Jana situation.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Right, and a Lilly and Sam situation, totally. No, I totally agree with.

JANA MORRISON: Because I can resonate so deeply with the character, and it doesn’t it’s not often that that happens. So, reality and fantasy really hit. I mean, I don’t necessarily have monsters in my life.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Physically, physical monsters.

JANA MORRISON: Physical monsters.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE PANELIST: That you know of.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: That we know of.

But, no, the internal monsters have definitely been there with us, and we’ve kind of gotten to grow and, I think, really learn from the characters as they kind of conquer their internal demons. So

JANA MORRISON: Yeah.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE PANELIST: Which is a blessing.

QUESTION: Great. Thank you very much.

JANA MORRISON: Thank you.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Thank you.

QUESTION: Hi. Noelle and Betsy, can you talk a little bit about the creation and development of the show, the hows and the whys and how it all worked out and the casting of the two young women here?

BETSY VAN STONE: Yeah. Noelle and I have always written strong female women who are dynamic and colorful and likeable and also unlikeable. And it was always a dream of ours to find two characters like that in high school. And then, you know, because of some experiences we had as kids or as teens, I guess these two characters developed that are outcasts and are called losers, but they rise above that. And maybe that’s something we wanted to do in high school

NOELLE STEHMAN: Yeah.

BETSY VAN STONE: you know.

NOELLE STEHMAN: Absolutely. And on a personal note, I can say I came from a small town, and one of our, sort of, social activities because there wasn’t much to do was driving around and looking to see what kids were doing, driving by their houses late at night. So, again, we didn’t open any portals that I know of, but that really was one of our social activities. That was part of the patrolling aspects of it.

BETSY VAN STONE: Oh, absolutely. Same here. I mean, suburban, high school town where, yeah, we would meet in the grocery store parking lot and then drive past people’s houses because what else do you do. So, we definitely injected some of our own experiences for sure.

QUESTION: And the casting process?

NOELLE STEHMAN: Well, that was just a dream process for us. I feel like got very lucky.

BETSY VAN STONE: Yeah. I mean, you know, you create a character in your head and you sort of picture who the actors are going to be more or less. And then we met Jana first, and it was no question. The second she opened her mouth, we knew that she was our Astrid. She also embodied her. She was wearing a very Astrid shirt and had her hair in a very Astrid look. And she actually Jana the actress influenced Astrid the character, and it was just it was just her from the beginning. We just knew it.

And then, once we had our Astrid, the trick was then to find a complimentary Lilly. And we met Sam. And we saw them interact on Zoom, mind you. And the chemistry on Zoom was so incredible, and right away they both got such a kick out of each other. And it was like, ah ha, that’s what we’re looking for. And it was one of those things that you couldn’t manufacture it. It just was, and it was evident on Zoom. And then when they met in person and we all met together, it was like, oh my god. These characters are real. This is real. This is magic. And we couldn’t be happier that we found them.

QUESTION: Thank you so much.

BETSY VAN STONE: Thank you.

JANA MORRISON: So giggly.

BETSY VAN STONE: It’s all true.

QUESTION: Hi, guys. This is for Noelle and Betsy. There’s a lot of shows that have supernatural elements to it, and one of the really fun things about developing a show like that is that you make your own bible. You determine, you know, what your how far you go, what kind of things we’re going to see. So just in terms of the supernatural elements and the demon aspects and the monsters, what’s kind of the first season, either parameters or the mythology that you want to you’re going to let us learn?

BETSY VAN STONE: You want to take this one?

NOELLE STEHMAN: I mean, I will say, first of all, if you love shows with monsters, this is absolutely for you. And each episode we try to create a monster that was fully formed and very dynamic in its own way, a monster that you want to watch and follow along with. Almost that you can’t tell if you want to root for, but probably not, but they’re that interesting. And each monster has a theme about them that sort of ties into a different theme of what the high school kids are going through in that episode. So that overall is the sort of model for the season. And some of the monsters are straight up terrifying. Some of them are a little bit funny. They’re all certainly quirky. I’m very excited for you to meet all of them.

BETSY VAN STONE: And I will just add that they’re not monsters you’ve seen before.

NOELLE STEHMAN: Yes.

BETSY VAN STONE: We created original, weird monsters, and they all have big personalities. And we’re super excited for y’all to get a whole picture of who they are, yeah.

QUESTION: Thanks.

BETSY VAN STONE: Thank you.

QUESTION: My question is also for the creators. How much of an influence because obviously this was the big, great grandmother of “high school is hell” shows. How much of an influence was “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” on you guys? And (foreign language). How is your show explicitly different from “Buffy”?

NOELLE STEHMAN: Well, I’m a huge we’re both huge “Buffy” fans. It’s something definitely that I grew up with. And there are certainly various homage moments to “Buffy” throughout this season, which you will see. But within that, we sort of it became a, sort of, model where we combined it with, sort of, a book-smart type aspect because this is about also a very close female friendship. And that’s one way that it differs.

And, also, we put an emphasis as we had said before on this outcast story and the idea that someone who you least expect can be a hero. And that extends to the way that the powers that the girls inherit are very quirky and not something that necessarily seems particularly helpful. And their monster guide is a bit quirky. So, yeah, I would say that it takes those models but turns them on their head a little bit.

Do you have anything else?

BETSY VAN STONE: No. I think you said that well, yeah.

QUESTION: Thank you very much.

BETSY VAN STONE: Thank you.

QUESTION: Hello. Also, for the creators, with a project like this and a title like this, you’ve got to come up with that combination of names that sing, whether it’s Bill and Ted, or Jay, which I personally like, in “Silent Bob.” How many variations did you go through to arrive at Astrid and Lilly?

BETSY VAN STONE: You know, they were kind of right away, Astrid and well, there was a slight tweak on Lilly, but

NOELLE STEHMAN: Yeah. The Astrid name has been there for so long, honestly, I don’t even

BETSY VAN STONE: I think Astrid was the first name we gave her, and it’s just like who she was at her core.

NOELLE STEHMAN: Yeah.

BETSY VAN STONE: It just made sense.

Lilly was a little bit after that, but it also it just felt like her. Astrid is kind of a bold, unapologetic name. And Lilly is a little softer and like a little more of a sensitive

NOELLE STEHMAN: Sensitive, yeah.

BETSY VAN STONE: of a name. And, so, they just really fit the two characters well.

QUESTION: Thank you very much.

BETSY VAN STONE: Thank you.

QUESTION: Hi, guys. Thanks for talking to us. This is for the two actresses. You talked about how you felt like outsiders before and how you connected to the characters. But can you talk about maybe what parts of the characters were the most difficult for you to connect to? You know, not including the monsters, because obviously

(Simultaneous speaking.)

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Yeah, for sure. Well, for me personally, I found that Lilly, she really wears her heart on her sleeve. And one thing, something I absolutely love about her and I personally don’t because I’m much more guarded and Lilly kind of opened me up, I found. I ended up learning a lot from her. So that was definitely difficult at first to access being so vulnerable openly all the time. And that’s one of the differences between the two characters, Lilly and Astrid. And, yeah, I think that was definitely the most difficult part to access, but definitely learned a lot from getting to be able to access that side of her.

JANA MORRISON: And you did it so beautifully.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Aww.

JANA MORRISON: And for me, I think something that was different from Astrid and I is that I have a hard time, like, speaking up for myself once in a while. And Astrid, if she doesn’t like something, oh, you’ll know it. And I think that’s something I can take away from Astrid. You know, as a woman who is Filipino and maybe sometimes reverts to keeping things to myself to not hurt others, I think I can do a little more speaking up and learning a little bit more from Astrid in that way.

QUESTION: Thank you so much, both of you.

QUESTION: Well, thank you for coming along. We wondered who was going to save us.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: We’re here for you.

JANA MORRISON: We got you.

QUESTION: You know, we all ask ourselves: What would I do if I was really tested, really confronted with something difficult? So, I want to know, in your young lives, what each you has been through that tested you and what your expectation of yourself is that you could get through things?

BETSY VAN STONE: Ooh. I mean, I guess I will say for myself there is a lot of Lilly and Astrid in me, you know. High school wasn’t always super easy, and that shifts your perspective, I think, for the rest of your life. So, I think I felt a little like, you know, I had to prove myself a little more maybe than some people. And, honestly, in creating these characters, I’ve actually learned a lot from them, which is weird because I wrote them. But they’ve really shown me, you know, if two 16 year olds can battle monsters and struggle through high school and come out of it feeling great, then maybe so can I?

NOELLE STEHMAN: Yeah. And I think the only thing that comes to mind is I moved schools right before middle school, which is one of the most awkward phases of time to be a stranger, and I did feel like an outsider at that time. And, I think, just learning that you can survive the idea of being sort of a fish out of water and it’s okay to be scared and it’s okay to be brave and you can get through the unknown. Which, you know, doing this show was a big unknown and a big, exciting challenge and just to embrace that kind of unknown and feeling, you know, like, taking on challenges.

QUESTION: And for our actresses, the actresses, do you feel like you’ve been tested, and what’s your assessment of your own strength?

JANA MORRISON: I feel like I have been tested kind of within this acting industry, because for so many years, you try really hard and you put your heart out there and you put yourself out there. And you think you believe in yourself, but when it doesn’t come at the time you want, it’s easy to let that dream go away. And I think that continuing to have that fire and confidence continue on is what really helped me get here. And there could have been times where I could have been doing something else, but this is something I really wanted.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Yeah.

JANA MORRISON: And I think the confidence in myself really helped me get through.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Mm hmm. Yeah. And I would say I was definitely tested. It was a really weird transition after high school for me, and it was I had this really weird, sort of, sense of unknowing and I didn’t really know what was going to happen. I kind of didn’t have much of a plan. I wasn’t really sure what life was going to throw at me or if life was going to throw anything at me. And then, funnily enough, this show happened and it kind of saved me a little, I think, in so many ways. But it definitely gave me this sort of reassurance that the unknown isn’t scary; or that it is scary but it’s okay and it’s okay to not know what’s going to happen next. And I really thank this show and I thank everyone for that, yeah.

QUESTION: Thank you, all, and thanks for coming to save us.

ALL PANELISTS: Thank you.

QUESTION: Okay. I have a question for each of the ladies here. For Noelle and Betsy, I’d like to know if you ladies have either teen children or teen relatives. What do they think about this show? And for the actresses, I’d like to know: Would your teenage selves what would they think of Astrid and Lilly?

NOELLE STEHMAN: Well, we don’t have teenage kids. I do have a niece who’s getting toward that age and she’s very excited. And our friends who have teen kids are very excited. I think, though, we’re, in a lot of ways, big teenagers ourselves.

BETSY VAN STONE: Yeah. Well, I was going to say something similar. Like, I don’t have any teenagers, but I am friends with

NOELLE STEHMAN: Yes.

BETSY VAN STONE: some teenagers, you know, friends’ kids.

And one thing I will say is they’ve all asked me why the show sounds like it was written by actual teenagers. They’re like, “It sounds like the way we talk. How did you guys do that?” And I think it’s because we’re, on a very base level, still 16.

JANA MORRISON: I think my high-school self would be a little intimidated by Astrid because of how she does whatever she wants and she doesn’t care what authority thinks. She just is, and if you don’t like it, you can go.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Yeah. I mean, I think my high-school self would probably really empathize with Lilly and would probably feel comfort in all of Lilly’s insecurities. And I think my high-school self would absolutely love this show and would get a lot from it. And, again, I wish I had this show when I was in high school because I feel like it would have really helped me.

JANA MORRISON: Uh, my high-school self would have loved the show.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Right? Right.

QUESTION: Thank you, ladies.

ALL PANELISTS: Thank you.

QUESTION: Hi. I’m from the Filipino channel ABS CBN, so, of course, my question is for Jana.

JANA MORRISON: Yay.

QUESTION: Asian matters. Phew, you can’t see me, but I’m a little bit teary eyed at the

JANA MORRISON: I am too. We’re good together.

BETSY VAN STONE: Me too.

QUESTION: You’re one of very few Filipino Americans in lead roles who’s also playing a Filipino character. So, what does this representation mean for you?

JANA MORRISON: It means a lot for me because, of course, growing up I’m actually I’m Canadian. And growing up in Canada, watching American shows, I had not seen any sort of Filipino representation on screen. And this is something in entertainment I wanted to do my whole life and I wanted to be a Filipino in this industry. And, thankfully, I have a group of Filipino mentors in this industry that really helped back me up and lift me up to say you can still do this and you need to continue because the other Filipinos around the whole world who want to do this will see you and want to follow their dreams also. So, it’s really important. And us Filipinos, oh, my gosh. We work so hard and I think we need a little more credit.

QUESTION: Well, thank you so much, and I hope to see you in person soon. I’m rooting for you always. You know, this is amazing, just watching the episodes and seeing you and seeing the person who plays your mom, who’s obviously Filipino.

BETSY VAN STONE: Yeah, she is.

JANA MORRISON: I want to say that that was a really amazing thing for the creators to bring for me. Because, you know, my mother’s Filipino, and to have my mother on the show be Filipino also, it is really touching to see the dynamic. And I’m really excited for the world to see our relationship on screen.

BETSY VAN STONE: Me too.

QUESTION: Salamat. That’s thank you in Tagalog. And if you ever need to consult in Tagalog, hey, holler.

JANA MORRISON: Oh, I’m going to holler. I’m going to holler. Salamat.

QUESTION: Thank you. And I wish you all the best.

JANA MORRISON: Thank you so much.

BETSY VAN STONE: Thank you so much for your question.

QUESTION: Thanks.

MATTHEW LIFSON: Oh, what a perfect question to end on.

Thank you to our panelists. That concludes our session for “Astrid and Lilly Save the World.” We’re going to take one more short break, and then we’ll pick it back up for our final panel of the day, NBC’s “Grand Crew.”

ALL PANELISTS: Thanks, everyone.

BETSY VAN STONE: Watch the show.

SAMANTHA AUCOIN: Yes.

JANA MORRISON: Thank you.

MORE INFO:

High school is hard enough when you’re different, but when outcast BFFs Astrid (Jana Morrison) and Lilly (Samantha Aucoin) accidentally crack open a portal to a terrifyingly quirky monster dimension, it gets a lot more complicated. It’s up to them to vanquish the creepy creatures and save the world, becoming the badass heroes they were meant to be. That is, if they can survive the horrors of high school.

“Astrid & Lilly Save the World” was written by Noelle Stehman and Betsy Van Stone, who executive produce along with Lance Samuels, Daniel Iron and Samantha Levine. Blue Ice Pictures will produce.

Samantha Aucoin

Lilly Fortenberry

ASTRID AND LILLY SAVE THE WORLD -- Season:1 -- Pictured: Samantha Aucoin as Lilly -- (Photo by: Alex Stead/Blue Ice Pictures/SYFY)
Samantha Aucoin makes her television debut as Lilly in the SYFY original new series “Astrid & Lilly Save the World.”

Aucoin is a Canadian singer, songwriter and actress from Beeton, Ontario, a small town north of Toronto. She began her acting career in local plays and would go on to play the lead roles in “Fiddler on the Roof,” “James and the Giant Peach,” “Mary Poppins” and many more. With a desire to venture into the television and film world, Aucoin attended an open call with BookItTalent agency in 2016.

Aucoin’s recording debut was on the album “What Is Christmas For.” She wrote three original songs for other singers and wrote and recorded the power anthem “Hip Hop, Santa Bop.” Aucoin has been spending the last year in the studio producing more original music.

 

 

 

Jana Morrison

Astrid Bell

ASTRID AND LILLY SAVE THE WORLD -- Season:1 -- Pictured: Jana Morrison as Astrid -- (Photo by: Alex Stead/Blue Ice Pictures/SYFY)
Jana Morrison plays Astrid in the new SYFY original series “Astrid & Lilly Save the World.”

Morrison is a Filipino-Canadian multi-disciplinary artist hailing from Winnipeg, Manitoba. Now based in Vancouver, she studied at the Canadian College of Performing Arts and is very passionate about performing on stage and in front the camera.

Most recently, she appeared on NBC’s “Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist” as well as Hallmark’s “Master of the Heart” and “Chesapeake Shores.” Morrison was recognized for her work in the British Columbia arts community and was awarded the Pro-Art Early Career Artist Award in 2020.

 

 

 

Noelle Stehman and Betsy Van Stone

Executive Producer

Noelle Stehman and Betsy Van Stone are the creators and executive producers of SYFY’s new original series “Astrid & Lilly Save the World.”

They began their partnership in New York writing for pop culture mecca VH1. From there they moved to Los Angeles where they started writing and developing for various outlets, including a YA genre pilot for Lionsgate as well as a feature for the team behind “How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days.” They also created, wrote and produced the web series “Clean Freaks” for Elizabeth Banks’ comedy site WhoHaha. Currently, they are crafting a holiday feature film for Viacom.

As a writing team, they are committed to creating dynamic female characters through their collective love of comedy, horror and sci-fi.

Proofread and Edited by Brenda

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poster for "Astrid & Lilly Save the World" on Syfy

Interview with Corey Reynolds and Alan Tudyk

TV Interview!

Corey Reynolds and Alan Tudyk of "Resident Alien" on Syfy

Interview with Corey Reynolds and Alan Tudyk of “Resident Alien” on Syfy by Suzanne 1/10/22

This was a short but fun call. I always love talking to these guys! They’re so fun to listen to, and so funny, both on and off the show. I gave them a rather weird question, but they handled it very well, like the professionals they are. Don’t miss the season premiere January 26 on Syfy!

Question:   This year, it looks like you guys have been set up as more foes than allies. What can you tell me about the investigation?

Corey:   Well, you know, at the end of last season, we found out who killed Sam Hodges, and this season we’re going to delve more into the why. You know, what exactly was the actual, the first, human Harry Vanderspeigle? What was he up to, and what type of chaos did Alan’s character inherit by taking over his life.? But [there’s] still a tremendous amount of hijinks that takes place as we pursue said leads in the case.

Alan:   Yeah, as foes, out of respect, they both have their amount of being idiots. Out of respect.

Corey:   Fact.

Alan:   Fact. So, as foes, I think that’s where the hilarity that ensues comes from, is that they’re both idiots, but, I mean, we started off as foes from the very beginning.

Corey:   Yes. You know, it’s the joke you made about the black truck from the very, very first moment that they met that set the tone in a way that they’re still trying to recuperate from.

Alan:   From the first “kung kung.”

Suzanne:   Hi, guys.

Corey:   Hi Suzanne.

Alan:   Hey.

Suzanne:   So, on the videos– we’ve seen a promo video. A lot of you guys [the cast] were saying that you believed in aliens, or that you saw aliens or ships. Recently, NASA was working with theologians and faith leaders to discuss how aliens visiting Earth might affect religion and religious people. Sorry, it’s such a deep question for early in the morning, but… how do you think people might react to the idea that humans are not the only sentient beings in the universe?

Alan:   Corey, I think you probably –

Corey:   I think we – I can’t remember exactly who said it; it might have been Reagan. I hope I’m right. someone’s going to look me up and either say I’m an idiot, or “my God, he knew that; he’s a genius,” but he said something about the arrival of aliens being a good thing, because basically, it would unify all of humanity. It would help us to see ourselves as a race of beings as opposed to beings of different races. And I’d like to believe that that’s what would happen, but over the last couple of years, there’s been this pandemic that’s taken place that I think has been a stress test of society, that in a lot of ways we’re failing. So, honestly, aliens could either be the thing that unites everyone or could be the thing that makes everyone go, “Okay, fuck. It’s a free for all. Let’s just tear it all and burn it all down.” So, I don’t know, but I know they exist, whether or not they want to come here – You know, I mean, I’m not getting on a cruise ship right now. It’s a giant soup of nastiness. So, we might be the COVID cruise ship of planets to aliens. You know what I mean? They may not want to go here, because we’re so polluted and rude and sick and angry and all of these things that we should be better at. So, I wouldn’t come here. I wouldn’t go house shopping in a fucking shed that’s built by the railroad tracks either. So, I don’t know that aliens would want to come here, if I’m being honest. I just ate up all the time with that.

Suzanne:   I like that, the COVID cruise ship…

Corey:   …of planets. That’s probably what we are.

Suzanne:   Alan, what’s your take on that?

Alan:   Oh, you know, I would love it if aliens would come here and help us with our problems….I don’t think we understand what would… what would happen. I don’t know. If they wanted to come here and remove carbon from our atmosphere or something like that, that would be great. Otherwise, they could just leave it alone as far as I’m concerned. I don’t think it’s going to be good. Soylent Green is people. You know, that’s mainly where I stand. Soylent Green is people.

Suzanne:   All right. And as a short follow up, what– how is it working with Nathan Fillion again, the octopus voice?

Alan:   Oh, it’s fantastic. It’s fantastic. He’s great this season. He’s a puppet. I mean, he is also CGI, but there’s a actual puppet on set in the tank that is being puppeted by people. And just having a Nathan Fillion octopus puppet that I’m having arguments with, and that’s my job; I’m pretty, pretty excited about that.

Suzanne:   Great. Thank you guys so much.

Question:   So, really quickly, one of the things I love about the trailer is that Mike’s just not buying this whole alien thing, and I don’t think he’s kind of bought it from the very beginning. So, kind of for the both of you, do you feel like that’s going to continue to be to Harry’s advantage this season, or are we gonna see Mike sorta kind of lean over a little bit and maybe start believing a little more?

Corey:   Al, you want to field that?

Alan:   No, no, you go for it.

Corey:   I think he has a healthy skepticism of UFOs, and I don’t see that – without getting into too much of the season, but I don’t see that changing very much. I think Mike’s very much into what he can see, smell, taste, touch, you know?

Alan:   Also, simultaneously, Sheriff Mike would suddenly believe in the Chupacabra?

Corey:   Oh, absolutely! And he believes in Bigfoot.

Alan:   Then there’s that!

Corey:   You know, he says that Bigfoot lives up in Seattle. And he also believes that women love buckets.

Question:   So that’s the line.

Corey:   You know, the aliens line is the line he won’t cross. That’s the one –

Alan:   They don’t love buckets? This is news to me. That explains why Christmas was so bad in the Tudyk household.

Corey:   Yes, the ladies love the buckets.

Alan:   I got my wife several buckets for Christmas. Hmm.

Corey:   [unintelligible]

Alan:   No, no. Dang it.

Corey:   So yeah, I think his skepticism of aliens remains pretty firm thus far.

Alan:   Lucky for me.

Publicist:   All right. We’re just trying to get you guys back on schedule.

Corey:   Oh, I understand. I ran a little long on my alien answer.

Publicist:   No, no, you’re good. You’re good. It makes it so hard when when they’re around tables to be quick. This next one is a one on one though, so I’m hoping we can kind of try to get us back on [track].

Alan:   TV week, you’ll see probably in Canada. It’s amazing. Like my wife and my dogs were attacked by a coyote by Stanley Park, and my mother in law heard about it across the country on her nightly news.

Publicist:   Yeah, everyone picked that up

Alan:   And then like suddenly my wife disappeared from the stories very quickly. There’s just I think me who was attacked.

Publicist:   Isn’t it funny how that happens?

Alan:   Yeah.

Publicist:   He should be joining any moment.

Alan:   Man, I’m terrible at the new Halo.

Corey:   I’ve been playing with my kid. We finally got the new Xbox X series. His Xbox that was so fucking overpriced. You pay like 750 bucks each for those things, because we have to get to, you know, because we both play, so that was part of the hang up was needing to get two of them at the same time. I threw it on – he’s been playing the online mode. I’m not there yet, because I don’t want to get murdered by eight-year-olds. You know what that means? You know, these ten-year-olds are killing us.

Alan:   Yeah, man. I’m destroyed they’re like playing a different game. I can’t. I’m last place every time, and I put so many hours into this game. But now the game has changed enough – what you want to do when you have a new a new version of it, Ii’s changed enough that you have to relearn it. But I think I’ve crossed the threshold. Old man.

Corey:   I’m with you, dude.

Here is the video version of it.

Interview Transcribed by Jamie of http://www.scifivision.com

MORE INFO:

Resident Alien poster

Based on the Dark Horse comics, SYFY’s “Resident Alien” follows a crash-landed alien named Harry (Alan Tudyk) whose secret mission is to kill all humans. In season two, Harry is once again stranded on Earth where he must confront the consequences of having failed his people’s mission to destroy the human race. On his new quest to protect the people of Earth, Harry struggles to hold on to his alien identity as his human emotions grow stronger by the day. In an adventure that takes Harry and Asta (Sara Tomko) all the way to New York City, Asta brings Harry into the arms of someone he can call family. While back in Patience, Sheriff Mike (Corey Reynolds) and Deputy Liv (Elizabeth Bowen) find themselves closer to unraveling the mystery of Sam Hodges’s murder. “Resident Alien” also stars Alice Wetterlund, Levi Fiehler and Judah Prehn.

From UCP, a division of Universal Studio Group, in association with Amblin TV and Dark Horse Entertainment, “Resident Alien” was adapted to television by executive producer Chris Sheridan. Mike Richardson and Keith Goldberg of Dark Horse Entertainment, Justin Falvey and Darryl Frank of Amblin TV, Robert Duncan McNeill, Christian Taylor and Nastaran Dibai also executive produce.

Proofread and Edited by Brenda

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Alan Tudyk and Corey Renolds in "Resident Alien" on Syfy

Interview with the cast of “Resident Alien”

TV Interview!

Creator Chris Sheridan with Alan Tudayk, Sara Tomko, Alice Wetterlund and Corey Reynolds of "Resident Alien" on Syfy

Interview with cast of “Resident Alien” on Syfy by Suzanne 12/9/21

It’s always great to talk to these people! They’re just very fun and hilarious! Much like the show. There may be some spoilers here, so you may not want to read it before watching the second season.

NBCUNIVERSAL VIRTUAL PRESS TOUR

SYFY

Resident Alien

Corey Reynolds, Talent, “Sheriff Mike Thompson” Sara Tomko, Talent, “Asta Twelvetrees” Alan Tudyk, Talent, “Harry Vanderspeigle” Alice Wetterlund, Talent, “D’Arcy Bloom” Chris Sheridan, Executive Producer/Creator

Virtual via Zoom

December 9, 2021

© 2021 NBCUniversal, Inc.  All rights reserved.

PAM BEER:  Hi.  I am Pam Beer to introduce our panel for “Resident Alien,” which we announced this morning will launch it’s second season on Wednesday, January 26th, at 9:00, on both SYFY and USA Network before moving exclusively to SYFY.  “Resident Alien” follows a crash‑landed alien named Harry, whose secret mission is to kill all humans.  In Season 2, Harry is once again stranded on Earth where he must confront the consequences of having failed his people’s mission to destroy the human race.  On his new quest to protect the people of Earth, Harry struggles to hold on to his alien identity as his human emotions grow stronger by the day.  Here is a clip from behind the scenes of “Resident Alien.”

In the top row are executive producer Chris Sheridan, Alan Tudyk, and Sara Tomko.  In the bottom row are Alice Wetterlund and Corey Reynolds.  We are now ready for your questions.

MATTHEW LIFSON:  Thank you, Pam.  And welcome to our panelists.  Just a reminder to use the “raise hand” function if you have a question.  Our first question comes from Mike Hughes and Suzanne Lanoue is on deck.  Mike, go ahead.

QUESTION:  Yeah.  Alan, you get to do a lot of weird things in this show, but I wanted to ask you about two of them.  One of them is running off with that, sort of, octopus in your hands, what was that like?  And the second one is getting to pronounce your actual real name from your planet, how hard was that to learn to pronounce that, and how difficult is that to do?

ALAN TUDYK:  Oh, yes.  Well, that’s excellent.  I forget you guys have seen the three episodes.  I haven’t seen that.  Running with the octopus was great because it’s made of rubber, some kind of silicone, and it does its own acting.  You just give it a little jiggle, and it really comes through.  It’s a great scene partner.  That was a blast.  We shot that in Ladysmith, which is a little town that (inaudible).  And running down the streets of Ladysmith with an octopus was fun to do.  I think it was popular with the local residents as well.  Anytime Harry speaks his language, it’s always fun.  I don’t know that it will ever be a language like Klingon where you go to conventions and people actually speak it as a language.  It’s much more illusive.  It’s very illusive.  So it’s like it’s a back‑and‑forth between me and the editors.  It switches up a little bit every take, and then they find the best string of sounds and probably facial expressions to go along with it that makes for the best scene.

QUESTION:  Okay.  Thanks.

ALAN TUDYK:  Thanks, man.

MATTHEW LIFSON:  Our next question comes from Suzanne Lanoue, and Abbie Bernstein will be on deck.  Go ahead, Suzanne.

QUESTION:  Good morning.  Nice to see you guys again.  Chris, I enjoyed the three episodes, and I love the music in the first three episodes that we saw, especially the “MASH” theme at the end.  Who chose the music, and will there be any more singing in this season?

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  I chose the music.  I have some music supervisors that help.  But I will say, the “MASH” theme ‑‑ these are all spoilers, by the way.  I can get into the specifics from these episodes that, probably, you can’t write about quite yet.  But the “MASH,” yeah, there’s that moment at the end of 3 where ‑‑ again, this is not to be revealed, but ‑‑ D’Arcy gets in the helicopter.  I had sent a picture of Alice in a helicopter to ‑‑

ALICE WETTERLUND:  A video.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  ‑‑ a video of Alice in a helicopter to Alice Wetterlund, and she sent it back to me with the wonderful “MASH” theme attached to it, and I was determined from that point on to put that in the episode.  So, we are in the process of playing ‑‑

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Lily, your daughter, Chris, is obsessed with “MASH.”

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  My daughter is obsessed with “MASH.”

ALICE WETTERLUND:  So, we are, kind of, always ‑‑ it’s in the zeitgeist of the show.  It’s conversation ‑‑

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Yeah.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  ‑‑ because it is in the zeitgeist.  And, so, I saw that footage, and it just ‑‑ a lot of the footage from the show ‑‑ and you can write about this ‑‑ is very beautiful.  We have incredible DPs.  And it just looked like film to me.  It looked old and gorgeous.  And I just was, like, “Oh, you’ve got to put the theme song.”  But in terms of who chooses the music ‑‑ and you should probably write this ‑‑ it’s mostly me and Levi.  And he does have a music supervisor that no one has ever met, but it’s really cool because Levi and I do a radio show for the cast and the crew.  And sometimes, every once in a while, Chris is nice enough to pick one of the songs that we’ve played on our radio show to put on the show, the actual show.  So, yeah, feel free to write about the radio show.  No one ever cares.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Yes, I do.  I definitely use the radio show to find music.  So, it’s all very helpful.

QUESTION:  And did you hear my other part of the question about will we see any singing this season?

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  We will.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Oh, you know we will.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Well, we will see singing.  We will see ‑‑ Alice will get to sing this year, which we are very excited about.  I don’t know which episode it is, but we will get to see Alice Wetterlund sing this year, which is going to be fantastic.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Well, there is a karaoke machine in the bar that you’ve written in for the season.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Yeah.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  So, you kind of ‑‑

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  I had to go back to it.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  It seems like everybody is going to make their rounds.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Yeah.  Alice is next.  We’ll see who goes next, maybe Sara.  Sara is good.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  I think so.

QUESTION:  Thank you so much.

MATTHEW LIFSON:  Our next question comes from Abbie Bernstein, and Jamie Ruby is going to be on deck.  Abbie, go for it.

QUESTION:  Hi.  I have two questions, actually, one for Mr. Tudyk and one for Mr. Sheridan.  I won’t print this until after the episodes have aired.  But, Mr. Tudyk, when Harry is playing other people, do you study those actors?  Do those actors go to Alan Tudyk school?  Does everybody just wing it?  How does that work?

ALAN TUDYK:  I recognize you.

QUESTION:  Hello.

ALAN TUDYK:  Hello.  I recognize your voice.  How is it going?

QUESTION:  Good.

ALAN TUDYK:  It is good to hear you.  It’s ‑‑ they’ve watched the show.  So, they, sort of ‑‑ I think they just go to Alan school, I guess.  And, yeah, it’s really up to them.  I make myself available if they want to talk about my process and how I go about it.  But, yeah, I mean, I guess you’ve seen the first three episodes.  So, is Alice born?

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  The first three episodes.

ALAN TUDYK:  So, you’ve seen that.  So, yes, Alice is just naturally an alien, I think.  She just has that about her, and it’s not just the probing.  She just comes across that way.  But I think Sara could probably speak to this a little bit as well because you had to do it, right?

SARA TOMKO:  Yeah.  I was going to jump in and say, I don’t remember what episode, but I had a small little part where I got to be Harry.  And I was going to ask you for advice, Alan, but I also was, like ‑‑ I think I just wanted to watch you.  I think I started really just, kind of, creepily staring at you as I got closer to that scene.

ALAN TUDYK:  I remember, when I woke up from my nap in my trailer, you were standing over me.

SARA TOMKO:  I was like this?

ALAN TUDYK:  It was a little odd.

SARA TOMKO:  Do you know what, Alan?  I have to say, the small, little time I got to be you, it’s very physical.  At least it was for me.  I felt like my whole body was stiff.  I felt like I had very mechanical movements.  Chris actually suggested I do this hand motion towards the door because that’s something you had done in a previous scene.  So, I did that.  But I also just felt like there’s a lot more than, I think, the audience can even see that you are doing.  I don’t know.  To me, it just felt like a full‑body workout.  And I was really, like, “Man, if I had to do this all the time, every day, I would be exhausted.”  So, I’m super proud of you.

CHRIS SHERIDAN: (Inaudible) with those, Sara.  That was Sara playing Harry playing Asta.  I mean, that was no ‑-

SARA TOMKO:  Yes.

ALAN TUDYK:  Right.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  ‑‑ (inaudible) good too.  Get Corey in on that.  Maybe Corey is the next one whose body Alan takes over.  I don’t know.

COREY REYNOLDS:  I’m looking forward to it.  I told you, I think that would be a really fun thing to jump into Harry’s body.  I think that would be great.  I think that’s one of the unique components of this show is that ‑‑ not to ‑‑ making sure I’m not giving away any spoilers here because I see this transforming thing is a potential spoiler, but I think that’s one of the really cool components of this show is that there’s this aspect of everyone getting a chance to ‑‑ or everyone Harry needs to embody getting a chance to provide their interpretation of Harry and of Alan’s performance of Harry.  I think that will be fun.  I look forward to it.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  About ten minutes before Alan’s (inaudible) scene playing Harry, I went up to her, and I said, “Do you want to spend some time with Alan?”  I said, “Alan is gracious as an actor, and he would want to spend time with her if she wanted to watch his movements or whatever.”  And she said, “I’m good.”  At least she had studied it on her own, but I was, like, “All right.”

QUESTION:  And, Mr. Sheridan, is the series still following the graphic novels, or has it taken off in its own direction now?

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  It took off in its own direction early on in Season 1, not that we don’t still pay homage to the novels.  We even look for different framing of some shots and some different shots from the graphic novels that we try to use in the show.  That first graphic novel was about the murder of Sam Hodges, which is continuing into the second season.  So that is still alive for us.  There is an episode where that is, sort of, pulled from one of the graphic novels that we are doing this season where Harry and Asta go to New York in search of an alien, and that is directly from one of the ‑‑ or indirectly ‑‑ directly and indirectly off of one of the graphic novels.  That was one of my favorite comments of theirs that they did.  I thought Peter Hogan and Steve Parkhouse did an incredible job with that one.  As soon as I read it, I thought that would be a great training for her, Alan, and Sara to do.  So, we worked that into the season.

SARA TOMKO:  At the time we talked about that, Chris, we were not in a pandemic.  So, I think we all thought, “We get to go to New York.”

ALAN TUDYK:  Yes.

SARA TOMKO:  And that didn’t happen.  But Vancouver is a pretty cool second New York.  I think they did a great job.

COREY REYNOLDS:  You guys went to Newcouver.

SARA TOMKO:  Newcouver.

COREY REYNOLDS:  Newcouver.

QUESTION:  Thank you very much.

MATTHEW LIFSON:  Our next question comes from Jamie Ruby, and then Jamie Steinberg is going to be on deck.  So, Jamie Ruby, go ahead.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Jamie.

QUESTION:  Hi, guys.  Thanks for talking to us today.  Alan, I want to know if you can talk about working with Judah because you two are so hilarious together.  Yeah.  Can you just talk about that and what it’s like working with him?

ALAN TUDYK:  I enjoy working with Judah.  I think he’s a great kid.  He’s funny.  He’s naturally funny.  So, I guess I have a lot of respect for him.  That probably helps.  He’s really funny.  It’s, like, his instincts are of a comedic instinct.  He sees what’s funny and can top it.  We did some improv this season.  There is a scene where ‑‑ it’s probably in the episodes you saw where he gets a spanking.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Yeah.  That’s enough.

ALAN TUDYK:  And so, yeah, he loved getting to just riff on “That doesn’t hurt.”  “You are doing it wrong.”  Anything he was saying during that, those were all things he came up with, and he really enjoyed it.  He’s come into this season very curious about the show.

COREY REYNOLDS:  “Longer than ever.”

ALAN TUDYK:  He’s just a cool kid.  I don’t have kids.  So, I like to think of him as not my own child but as, like, a child that my dog might own.  So ‑‑ we have a dog.  So, I can relate.  So, it’s sort of a distant child in that way.

SARA TOMKO:  I can relate that way too.

QUESTION:  Thank you so much.

MATTHEW LIFSON:  Next up is Jamie Steinberg, and Valerie Milano will be on deck.  Jamie, go ahead.

QUESTION:  I love getting to see Alan with Alice.  I just think it’s kind of, like, two comedy giants playing off of each other.  Talk a little bit, Alan, how much of your scenes are improv, how much of it is scripted, and just in general working with Alice.

ALAN TUDYK:  Working with Alice is fantastic.  I’ve loved her work for a very long time.  I’m a big fan of “Maisel,” and that she joined us this season was fantastic, and that she got to be my love interest was even more ‑‑ my love interest or just the object of my affections was brilliant.  It was a lot of fun.  Her relationship with Chris goes back a long way.  You can see it when the two of them are together.  They have a really strong friendship.  It was really fun to watch them, really more than anything, together.  And we embrace some in that scene, I’m remembering.  As far as improv goes, there’s leeway.  And everybody can speak to this because everybody does this.  Chris is a very generous creator in a lot of ways.  But as far as listening to the actors when we have dialogue that could possibly be a little more in our character voice, we have something, like, a word ‑‑ there’s a lot of stuff, like, from Harry that he’ll say, “Can I say this word instead of this word? because, the way that my process is, Harry wouldn’t say this word.  Can we substitute this word or this phrasing?”  There’s a lot of that.

And then we usually have, I know for myself, an opportunity to, kind of, play, especially if it’s a joke.  If it’s just a joke, the punch line, you can do the punch line as many different ways as you want — or the out of the scene.  Yesterday, we were shooting something with a scene, and there was, like, “Oh, what if I’m sitting at my desk.  What if I had a glass of Alka‑Seltzer?  Yeah, can we get a glass of Alka‑Seltzer?  All right.  I’ll do the plop, plop, fizz, fizz, and I’ll be watching the fizzing of the thing, and it’s confusing to me why it’s floating and then have the scene.  Sara and I will have a scene, and then I’ll drink it, and it will be disgusting, and I’ll almost throw up.  I’ll sit there, fizzing through the scene.”  And then it was taking too long to get the Alka‑Seltzer because they had to go to the store.  I was, like, “Well, what if we do this with this, or what if we did this?”  And we’d just throw out ideas, and we came up with something that actually turned out to be more fun.  I know Alice herself does a lot of improv because you are comedy.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Oh, yeah.  Well, I was going to say ‑‑

ALAN TUDYK:  You are comedy.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  ‑‑ that is a really high praise coming from you, but there is something to say.  I mean, Chris is so generous.  Robbie is generous to the point that I’m testing it.  You say he gives us as many takes as we want as long as there’s a punch line, and I’m counting.  And, eventually, I’m going to find out how many is the most and is the cap for that because I’m getting to it, I feel like.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Well, Corey is the same way.  Corey had a scene last year where I was so confident in Corey’s improv abilities.  It was when he was interrogating the lanky stoner in that school classroom.  We wrote stuff, but I basically said to him, “This is going to be you.”  So, all of that stuff that was on the screen was just Corey being ridiculous.  So that was fun.

COREY REYNOLDS:  That is one of the best perks of this job for me.  During the course of my career, I’ve never had the opportunity to have as much influence over a character’s choices and voice, and that’s all a testament to Chris and Robbie and our leadership being open to allowing us to explore these different things.  And they are not all homeruns.  I’ll pitch something to him sometimes, like, “Hey, man, what do you think about this?  What if dah, dah, dah, dah, dah?”  And he’ll go, “Uhhhh,” when you know that that’s not necessary.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Let’s do another pitch first.  The Alan and Alice stuff, I will say ‑‑ they were doing one of the scenes that I’ve written, and I thought they should have a little fun.  So, I told the script supervisor, “I’m going to go in and maybe see if they can do the lab or whatever.  We can figure something out.”  She comes over, and she says, “Well, for me, I want to know what they are going to say.”  And I was, like, “I don’t know what they are going to say.  I don’t have it written.  I just figure these two people will come up with it.”  So, I just said to Alice, like ‑‑ I said, “Just ask Harry, like, does he like to travel and just see where it goes.”  And we laughed.  And they called “action,” and then Alan and Alice went on for between five and ten minutes before the scene started.  I can remember that.  It was unbelievable, something about (inaudible) and monkeys in cages.  It was unbelievable.  The first part of that show was 19 minutes long.

QUESTION:  The best SYFY for, like, a longer episode that time, can you just expand on that so we can fit in the improv?

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  There’s a tremendous amount of ‑‑ actually, there’s a lot of incredible stuff that we can’t fit in the show from everybody, from everyone on this panel, I mean, just really great stuff.  You have to make your choices.  But, yeah, there’s a whole episode with all of their improv.  I’m sure somehow, we can piece that together.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  There’s a side show that I’m pitching with Corey, definitely, to get out of our ‑‑ because, like, we ‑‑ Corey and I were in one scene together so far this season, and I was, like, “Why don’t we get to do more episodes together, man?”  And then, when we started going back and improvising on top of each other, I was, like, “Oh, this is why.”

COREY REYNOLDS:  “Oh, this is why they don’t get us together.”  It takes me back to the bowling alley scenes, which is, I believe, my first day of filming.  And I think we went, like, three or four takes in before Robbie was, like, “Okay.  Guys, do you know what?  I think it’s important that we at least get one that’s, like, as written, you know, maybe just one.  Can we just get one?  Once we have one that’s on the page, we are good to go, but we should probably for safety.  Let’s get at least one that is what’s written,” because I think we just decided that “Oh, yeah, the script is just a suggestion.”  We just decided to go on our own little tangents there.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Having never worked with each other before at all.

COREY REYNOLDS:  It’s also the very first day.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  The behind‑the‑scenes arrest in Episode 10 from the first season ‑‑

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Yeah.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  ‑‑ Corey was arresting Alice.

COREY REYNOLDS:  Oh.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  And you were talking about pulling hair.  I think Alice ‑‑

COREY REYNOLDS:  Her fighting style was a mix of volleyball and capoeira or something like that.  It was just ridiculous stuff.

QUESTION:  Well, thank you all so much for bringing a little bit of levity to our lives during these times.  It means so much.

ALAN TUDYK:  Thank you.

MATTHEW LIFSON:  Our next question comes from Valerie Milano, and Janice Malone is going to be on deck.  Valerie, go ahead.

QUESTION:  This question is probably mostly for Chris but if any of the talent wants to chime in.  In the last episode, Harry must rely on Asta and D’Arcy for survival.  How does that change the dynamics of the characters, and will we see more of this in the second season?

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  That’s a good question.  That was in Episode 8, I think ‑‑

QUESTION:  Yes.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  ‑‑ and in 10 as well.  Asta depended on it for survival.  It’s an example of Harry’s growing emotional state and ability to process human emotions where, in the first season, he learns to love and learns what friendship is and connects him to Asta, which is what ends up saving the human race.  I think his journey in Season 2 is, sort of, extending that humanity to people outside of Asta.  So, learning empathy and trying to realize that maybe there’s other people in this world ‑‑ at the beginning of it anyway, other people in the world who he can maybe care about as well in addition to Asta.  So that definitely continues into the second season, and it is going to be a slow burn.  We don’t want to do it too quickly where, suddenly, he’s caring about everybody because a lot of the comedy goes away at that point.  That’s not really going to happen until the very end of the series where he, sort of, figured it all out.  But, yeah, we are going to continue that.  As far as has it changed anything, I don’t think ‑‑ D’Arcy saving his life I don’t think really did much for him.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  No.  Almost, like, less.  I want to hear from Sara because, like, I’ve seen this from what I’ve seen in their interactions this season, that Sara ‑‑ the Asta‑Harry connection, it’s super deep now, and there’s a familiarity that is familial.  I just watch.  Like, he is getting to know the world, holding hands with you, and it’s, like, he has this safety net in you, and it’s really touching to watch.

SARA TOMKO:  Yeah.  There’s this really beautiful scene we have together once again in a really cool location where we were looking out over the lake.  In Season 1, we are looking out over the mountains while I’m barefoot in the snow, and in Season 2, it’s kind of the summer version of that, not quite barefoot but still looking out over a body of water, over the lake.  And we have this great conversation about that family is not just who you are blood‑related to, but it’s chosen and that there are people in your lives that you really care for, and you need to figure out who those people are.  And it kind of occurs to Asta, after she has a talk with her dad, that she’s maybe the only one that Harry cares for, and that’s a lot of responsibility when she’s got the whole world on her shoulders.  So, then she starts, kind of, pushing him out of the nest, which Alice is right.  We started having what felt like a mother‑son relationship a little bit.  She was, like, “You’ve got to get out there and meet people.”  And she has to have conversations with him, talking to him about his feelings, about pain, about fear, about family.  All the while, she’s still trying to connect with her daughter, and she’s also still learning about how to ask for help.  She’s going to, you know, without telling any spoilers, end up coming to D’Arcy for guidance in a way she never has before.  So, I think, once again, you are going to see Harry and Asta in this very similar trajectory in Season 2 where they are both still learning how to reach out and ask for help, which is pretty special.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Very well put.  Also, I think, in a way, Harry is so childlike.  I think it’s, sort of, Asta learning how to be a mother.

SARA TOMKO:  Yeah.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  And if she ever comes back around and has a real relationship with Jay, she can take that learning that she’s gotten from Harry to be a better mother for Jay someday.

SARA TOMKO:  Definitely.

COREY REYNOLDS:  She will be prepared to change Harry at some point.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Absolutely.

COREY REYNOLDS:  If he needs a change of some kind.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Yeah.

SARA TOMKO:  What did you say, Corey?  What did you say down there?  Can you hear me at the angle you are at?

MATTHEW LIFSON:  All right.  Our next question comes from Janice Malone, and Arlene Martinez will be on deck.  Janice, go ahead.

QUESTION:  Yes.  Hello.  This is such a fun show.  I’m so glad to see you guys come back for another season.  I’d just like to ask the entire panel here, has anyone ever, ever had what might be considered a UFO, extra‑terrestrial citing, or do you think you’ve ever met an extra‑terrestrial?

ALICE WETTERLUND:  I’ve done ‑‑ that’s a question an extra‑terrestrial would ask.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Yeah.  Does anybody else have anything?

ALAN TUDYK:  Chris.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  I did see a UFO once.  I was on my honeymoon.  I was at the beach.  I told this before, but I’ll tell it again.  It was 10 o’clock at night in the Bahamas.  It was very, very dark.  You could see every star in the sky, and suddenly, this star on the horizon started rising up.  We looked at it, like, “Why is that moving?”  And then it came at us, and within two or three seconds, it was above us.  It was a triangular shape with, like, six lights on the bottom of it.  It was light in the front, and it hit us right in the face.  The ship didn’t hit us.  The light hit us.  That would be a story.  And then it kept going, and that was it.  And even in that moment, I’m, like, “Did we just see that?”  I made a mental note to not let myself forget the fact that that was real.  So, I don’t know what it was, but it was certainly alien.

ALAN TUDYK:  And it made no noise, right?

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  It made no noise.  It was literally upon us from the horizon to above us in about three seconds.  It just moved way faster than anything that we know of as humans on this earth.  So that definitely happened to me.  And, honestly, doing this show, I’ve met a lot of people who have come up to me and said, “You know, I’ll tell you, I saw this thing.”  A lot of people have seen this stuff, and there’s starting to be less stigma around it now.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Yeah.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  People are starting to come out with it.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Well, also, the government was, like, “Yeah, aliens are real.  Sorry.”  So that helps.

COREY REYNOLDS:  I mean, statistically speaking, it is virtually impossible that there isn’t alien life in the universe.  I think the biggest question comes the distance between stars or the distance between space time of getting to a place where they could actually get here or we could go there.  However, if you are talking about a civilization that might be millions or billions of years older than humanity, who is to say that they haven’t mastered space time travel, you know.  I think you’d be an idiot to think that we are the only intelligent life in the universe.  It’s stupid to think that.

ALAN TUDYK:  We are intelligent?

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  I don’t think we can compare it to the (inaudible) movie when you taught him that (inaudible.)

COREY REYNOLDS:  Yeah.

QUESTION:  Thank you.

MATTHEW LIFSON:  It looks like we have time for one final question, and that is going to come from Arlene Martinez.  Arlene, go ahead.

COREY REYNOLDS:  No pressure, Arlene.

QUESTION:  Hi.  Nice to meet you all.  I was just going to ask you about what she just asked you guys about, UFOs, if you guys actually believe in it because I have a husband who is actually in Space Force, and we have arguments every time that we watch shows like this.  It’s, like, “No, there’s this.  There’s that.”  And he was actually watching, me with him, this show.  He’s, like, “Oh, my gosh.  So much,” and, like, “What do you guys” ‑‑ you know, he said about his experience, but I know we are not the only ones.  That’s my argument with my husband.  But do you actually believe there’s aliens out there?

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Wait.  So, your husband is Space Force and doesn’t believe in aliens?

QUESTION:  He always has an explanation for everything.  He actually works for space, the government.  So, he watches satellites.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  So, he’s a scientist, essentially?

QUESTION:  No, I don’t call him a scientist, but he just watches what happened here if we get missiles, and he just stops the missiles.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Yeah.  I think it’s the difference between believing and needing evidence.  If you need evidence, it’s not, like, a believer faith, right?

QUESTION:  Uh‑huh.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  I, for instance, have never had any alien experience or anything close to an alien experience, but I’m not closed off to the idea that there are ‑‑ I mean, I just know that the more science progresses and the more astronomy progresses and the exploration of physics, the less we know we know of things we thought we knew about.  And, so, what’s the point of saying there’s no ‑‑ there’s an explanation for everything?  I mean, okay.  Sure.  But, like, we don’t have all of the explanations yet, and that’s okay.  It doesn’t mean we are deficient as an intelligent species.  It just means where we are.

COREY REYNOLDS:  Apparently, there are.

SARA TOMKO:  Right now, we are a floating ball in the sky in a galaxy.  Do you know what I mean?  It’s freaking crazy.  So, I feel like our existence is alien, and maybe there’s theories, and everybody has their opinions, but nobody knows what we are doing here.  So why not?  There’s so many options, so many different stories to listen to.  Everybody has a different story to tell, and it doesn’t mean that we should be pointing fingers and saying, “No, you are wrong.”  You both are right, you and your husband.  And we all have a feeling and a way that we are existing in this world, but I personally think we are all alien.

COREY REYNOLDS:  If you think about it like this for a second, if you think about, like, the ocean ‑‑ right? ‑‑ to fish, we live in outer space, right?  And to fish, sometimes they get caught.  And you weigh them, and you measure them and this and that, and then you throw them back into the water.  And that fish probably swims down to other fish.  He’s, like, “Holy shit.  You are not going to believe this.  I was just abducted by these humans, and they probed me, they measured me, they took my weight, and then they just returned me.”  Like, “Dude, shut the fuck up.  You didn’t get taken into space or anything like that.”  Do you know what I mean?  So, to think that we couldn’t see that relatively happening to humanity as well like we are in space to fish.  Do you know what I’m saying?  We live in an environment that they can’t breathe in, that they can’t stay in for any sustained amount of time.  To be in this environment, they would need a life‑support system.  We are in space to them.  So, relatively speaking, I have no doubt that there’s something that comes down here and picks us up and dah, dah, dah, dah, dah, and measures us and probes us and sticks shit in our asses, all of this stuff.  And they are just, like, “Oh, okay.  All right.”  And then they just toss them back.  I don’t see how that’s any different.  I think, if you use that as a metric, it’s clear to see that it’s absolutely possible, not only possible but quite feasible, that something like that happens to humanity.

ALAN TUDYK:  I need to get you to stop probing your fish.  That seems very invasive and unnecessary.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Hey, don’t knock it.

COREY REYNOLDS:  What did you learn from shoving your hand up that fish’s ass?

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  Just weigh it and put it back.  What are you doing?

ALICE WETTERLUND:  Oh, I’m sorry.  If something is in front of me, I’m going to probe it.

COREY REYNOLDS:  Sorry.  This hand ain’t made for probing.  Sorry.

MATTHEW LIFSON:  I don’t think we can top that.

COREY REYNOLDS:  This finger is radicular.

MATTHEW LIFSON:  So, I’m going to thank all of our guests.

SARA TOMKO:  A fish’s body, a fish’s choice.’ALICE WETTERLUND:  And you can keep that in.  You keep that in.  You write that stuff.

COREY REYNOLDS:  Right?  Absolutely.

CHRIS SHERIDAN:  It’s why fish are growing feet on land and fight us.

COREY REYNOLDS:  Absolutely.  This is the beginning of a giant battle that’s going to take place and what they feel is an interest, like, in space battle.  They’ve got their own Space Force.  They already have their own opinions about humans.  There we go.

MATTHEW LIFSON:  Well, I think we are ending on the highest of notes.  So, I’m going to thank the panelists.  That concludes the session for “Resident Alien.”  We will take a short break and pick back up with NCB’s “American Auto” at 10:45.

ALICE WETTERLUND:  And I’m going to be there for that too.  See you there.

Scifivision Interview with Chris Sheridan

MORE INFO:

Based on the Dark Horse comics, SYFY’s “Resident Alien” follows a crash-landed alien named Harry (Alan Tudyk) whose secret mission is to kill all humans. In season two, Harry is once again stranded on Earth where he must confront the consequences of having failed his people’s mission to destroy the human race. On his new quest to protect the people of Earth, Harry struggles to hold on to his alien identity as his human emotions grow stronger by the day. In an adventure that takes Harry and Asta (Sara Tomko) all the way to New York City, Asta brings Harry into the arms of someone he can call family. While back in Patience, Sheriff Mike (Corey Reynolds) and Deputy Liv (Elizabeth Bowen) find themselves closer to unraveling the mystery of Sam Hodges’s murder. “Resident Alien” also stars Alice Wetterlund, Levi Fiehler and Judah Prehn.

From UCP, a division of Universal Studio Group, in association with Amblin TV and Dark Horse Entertainment, “Resident Alien” was adapted to television by executive producer Chris Sheridan. Mike Richardson and Keith Goldberg of Dark Horse Entertainment, Justin Falvey and Darryl Frank of Amblin TV, Robert Duncan McNeill, Christian Taylor and Nastaran Dibai also executive produce.

From UCP, in association with Amblin TV and Dark Horse Entertainment, RESIDENT ALIEN was adapted to television by executive producer Chris Sheridan (“Family Guy”). Mike Richardson (“Hellboy”) and Keith Goldberg (“The Legend of Tarzan”) of Dark Horse Entertainment (“The Umbrella Academy”), and Justin Falvey (“The Americans”) and Darryl Frank (“The Americans”) of Amblin TV also executive produce. David Dobkin (“Wedding Crashers”) executive produced and directed the pilot.

Alan Tudyk

Harry Vanderspeigle, “Resident Alien”

Alan Tudyk stars in SYFY’s “Resident Alien” as “Harry Vanderspeigle,” an alien that crash lands onto Earth and must pass himself off as a small-town human doctor.

Emmy nominated Tudyk is a multi-dimensional actor whose credits span throughout stage, film, television and voiceover entertainment platforms.

In 2016, Tudyk appeared in Lucasfilm’s “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” as the scene-stealing security droid, ‘K-2SO.’ Directed by Gareth Edwards, the film grossed over $1 billion at the global box office and was the first live action Star Wars spin-off. He also voiced characters in two Academy-Award nominated animated films, playing the ‘Duke of Weaselton’ in Disney’s “Zootopia” and the rooster ‘Hei Hei’ in Disney’s “Moana.”

Tudyk is also the creator, executive producer and star of the Emmy nominated series “Con Man,” which was funded via Indiegogo with a record-breaking $3.2 million donation from over 46,000 fans. “Con Man” debuted at Lionsgate’s Comic Con HQ in 2015 and later aired on SYFY. Loosely based on Tudyk and Nathan Fillion’s experiences starring in “Firefly,” “Con Man” centered on the post-show life of ‘Wray Nerely’ (Tudyk) after “Spectrum,” a sci-fi TV series canceled before its time that later became a cult classic. In 2016, Tudyk, along with Fillion, also launched “Con Man: The Game” based on the series which allowed players to build and host their own comic book conventions.

Tudyk has shown audiences wide versatility in numerous television shows and a plethora of feature films. Recently, he co-starred in the Jay Roach 2015 SAG Award nominated feature “Trumbo,” opposite Bryan Cranston, Diane Lane, Helen Mirren and John Goodman as well as 2014’s “Welcome to Me” with Kristin Wiig. In 2013, Tudyk co-starred in the well-received Jackie Robinson biopic, “42,” opposite Chadwick Boseman as former Philadelphia Phillies manager ‘Ben Chapman.’ He made his feature film debut in 1998, when he first appeared opposite Robin Williams in “Patch Adams.”

Tudyk’s role in the Disney animated feature, “Wreck-It Ralph,” garnered him an Annie Award for his role as ‘King Candy.” He can also be heard in its sequel, “Ralph Breaks the Internet” as ‘KnowsMore.” Tudyk has also loaned his voice to ‘The Duke of Weaselton’ in Disney’s Academy Award-winning film “Frozen,” ‘Alister Krei’ in “Big Hero 6” and ‘Ludo’ and ‘King Butterfly’ on the Disney Channel series, “Star vs. the Forces of Evil.”

His additional film credits also include: “28 Days,” “A Knight’s Tale,” “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story,” “Death at a Funeral” (the original UK version), “Knocked Up,” “Tucker and Dale vs Evil,” “3:10 to Yuma,” “Serenity,” “Premature,” “Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter” and “Transformers 3.” Additionally, Tudyk motion performed the lead robot, ‘Sonny,’ in “I, Robot” opposite Will Smith.

In television, Tudyk can currently be seen in DC Universe’s “Doom Patrol” and season three of Netflix’s “Santa Clarita Diet.” He was a series regular on the critically acclaimed ABC comedy, “Suburgatory” as well as on NBC’s workplace comedy “Powerless” and BBC America’s “Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency. His work on Joss Whedon’s “Firefly,” has been highly lauded by fans and has gained him a strong cult following. Tudyk also appeared in “Strangers with Candy,” “Dollhouse,” “Frasier,” “Justified” and “Arrested Development.” He also was the host of “Newsreaders,” written and produced by Rob Corddry and David Wain, on Adult Swim.

Tudyk attended the prestigious Juilliard School in New York and has starred on Broadway opposite Kristin Chenoweth in “Epic Proportions,” played ‘Lancelot’ with the original cast in Monty Python’s “Spamalot,” as well as the lead role of ‘Peter’ in “Prelude to a Kiss” opposite John Mahoney.

Tudyk grew up in Plano, Texas and currently resides in Los Angeles with his wife.

He is represented by The Coronel Group and Gersh.

Sara Tomko

Asta Twelvetrees, “Resident Alien”

Sara Tomko stars in SYFY’s “Resident Alien” as Asta Twelvetrees. Strong and sarcastic, she works with Harry at the town’s health clinic.

Tomko is known for her recurring roles on “Sneaky Pete” and “Once Upon a Time,” as well as her appearances on “The Leftovers” and “The Son.”

She started her career in experimental theatre and musicals in Virginia, later moving to Los Angeles in 2007 to pursue film. Her first independent film roles aired on SYFY, and she is thrilled that her TV career has brought her full circle. She is an actor, singer, producer, poet an artist.

Tomko is represented by Bohemia Group and KMR Talent.

Corey Reynolds

Sheriff Mike Thompson, “Resident Alien”

Corey Reynolds stars in SYFY’s “Resident Alien” as Mike Thompson, the local sheriff who runs the town with a chip on his shoulder, a cowboy hat on his head and an iron fist.

Reynolds is best known for his role on “The Closer,” which he starred on for six seasons. He will next be seen in the “Redline” and “Criminal Minds.” He recurred on “NCIS: Los Angeles,” “Masters of Sex” and “Murder in the First.” He has guest starred on “Seal Team,” “Chicago PD” and “Criminal Minds.”

On the film side, he was last seen on screen in “Straight Outta Compton.” He can also be seen in the “Selma,” opposite David Oyelowo and Common.

Previously, he was nominated for a Tony Award for his performance as ‘Seaweed’ in Broadway’s production of “Hairspray.”

Alice Wetterlund

D’Arcy Bloom, “Resident Alien”

Alice Wetterlund stars in SYFY’s “Resident Alien” as “D’Arcy Bloom,” the charismatic bartender at the local pub who, as a former Olympic snowboarder, is also a part of the avalanche control team.

Wetterlund has performed her non-yelling brand of comedy nationally at colleges, clubs, and festivals such as Just for Laughs, Bridgetown, Moon Tower, Women in Comedy, SF Sketchfest, RIOT LA, Bonnaroo and more.

She is known for her character “Carla” on HBO’s “Silicon Valley” and played “Kelly Grady” on TBS’ “People of Earth.” She can also be seen in the movie “Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates” as “Cousin Terry.” She has performed her stand up on “Conan” and currently co-hosts the popular podcast “Treks and the City” with Veronica Osorio. She recently wrapped “Search & Destroy” for Hulu, produced by Carrie Brownstein. Wetterlund can currently be seen on the latest season of Netflix’s “Glow.” Her hourlong stand-up special premiered on Amazon in August.

Chris Sheridan

Executive Producer, “Resident Alien”

Chris Sheridan serves as executive producer of SYFY’s “Resident Alien.”

Five-time Emmy nominee and BAFTA nominee, Sheridan has been a television writer and producer for 26 years. He has produced more than 400 episodes of television, including 17 seasons on the Fox Network animated hit, “Family Guy” where he acted as co-showrunner from 2004 to 2009. He remains a consulting producer on “Family Guy,” and has a feature film in development with Josephson Entertainment.

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Resident Alien poster

Interview with the cast of “Chucky”

TV Interview!

actors from "Chucky" on Syfy

Interview with creator Don Mancini and actors Zackary Arthur, Brad Dourif, Devon Sawa, and Jennifer Tilly of “Chucky” on Syfy by Suzanne 9/13/21

This was a very fun press panel for TCA about the new Syfy show “Chucky,” based on the “Child’s Play” movies. I was surprised at how my question was answered, but that’s okay…that’s part of the fun of interviewing – you never know what kind of answer you’ll get!
I’m not really a horror fan. I don’t mind some shows, like “Supernatural” or “Legacies,” but I find horror movies and many of the shows to be very depressing and too gross, so I avoid them. The “Chucky” first episode is not too gory, but apparently it does get more so, judging from what said here.
Also, I like to root for the hero, and in these type of shows, the horror entity (in this case, Chucky) usually wins. Or at least, he’ll kill off an awful lot of people before he dies.

NBCUNIVERSAL SUMMER 2021 TCA VIRTUAL PRESS TOUR
USA & SYFY Chucky
Zackary Arthur, Actor, “Jake Webber”
Brad Dourif, Actor, Voice of “Chucky”
Devon Sawa, Actor, “Logan Wheeler”
Jennifer Tilly, Actor, “Tiffany Valentine”
Don Mancini, Creator/Showrunner/Executive Producer
Virtual via Zoom September 13, 2021

I asked this question: I haven’t seen any of the “Child’s Play” movies, but I assume that they have a lot more gore and violence than the TV show. Was that a decision you made, or did the network tell you not to make it too gory? Or how did that come about?”

They all laughed when I said that, which was a bad sign. Don Mancini, the showrunner, replied that I should just wait. In other words, it does get a lot more gory and violent. Oh, that’s too bad. Well, now I know not to watch any more of the shows. Stars Zackary Arthur and Jennifer Tilly chimed in to add that they have a whole “blood team” that works on the movie. Mancini continued to say that it was important to him to retain “all of the aspects of the franchise that the fans love, one of which is the gore, the other of which, of course, is Chucky’s propensity for dropping f-bombs. And the networks SYFY and USA, when we pitched the project, assured us that there would be no compromise in these departments.” He went on to explain that when he worked on “Hannibal” for NBC, and “Channel Zero” for Syfy (both for NBC/Universal), he was surprised at how far they let him push the envelope on this sort of thing. He mentioned that there will be “no compromises” in that regard. He went on to remind us that in the first episode, the first death that Chucky causes has no blood because he’d heard his new buddy Jake say that he doesn’t like seeing blood. He chuckled, “that’s Chucky’s idea of being thoughtful.”

Mancini was also asked if he’d ever thought of exploring the childhood of the original murderer, Charles Lee Ray (the ghost that inhabits the Chucky doll) for a movie sequel before. He concurred that fans have been wanting to see that for decades. this was one of the reasons he wanted to do a TV series, where there’s a lot more time to delve into his background and other “storytelling.”

Another reporter asked about other stylistic changes between the movie and the TV show. Mancini replied, it’s very important to me, and I try to have a different overriding, governing aesthetic for each film” and now with the TV show. This is the first time they’ve presented Chucky during the Halloween season. He wanted to really have a “luxurious and glamorous
autumn look with fall foliage …that became the central aesthetic principle.” This gave them some challenges because they shot it during the spring and summer seasons. They had to have trucks bring in artificial fall leaves for them to spread around the set. They had also shot drone footage least year of the fall outdoors, outside of Toronto, where they shoot the show. He added, “it looks like a Halloween horror movie as directed by Dario Argento or Brian De Palma. At least, that was our goal.”

Tilly praised their production designer and cinematographer, who made the show look beautiful. She feels that it looks very different from “Cult of Chucky,” which took place in the winter in a mental institution, where it was very sterile. She says that the set design looks very expensive, and maintains that it is, indeed, expensive. She was surprised at how much money they have for the series. Devon Sawa added in his two cents that he, also, was shocked when he arrived at how big their budget must be, since there were so many departments, and how many people that were working in them. He also praised at the beautiful job they did on the look of the show. “It looks stunning. It’s so beautiful to look at.”

Then a journalist asked Sawa and Zackary Arthur, who are new to the franchise, what their perceptions were before they joined, and what questions they’d had. Sawa admitted that he was already a fan, having grown up with the Chucky series of movies. He leaped at the chance to audition for it. He piled on the kudos to both Chucky and his voice, Brad Dourif, calling them “legends.” He said, Chucky belongs on the Mount Rushmore of horror with, you know, Krueger and Jason.” He was thrilled to be part of this show. Mancini jokingly gave him a hard time for not mentioned the script, too, but Sawa seriously added, quickly, that the script was great, too. He also loved playing twins in the show.

Tilly jokingly asked Arthur, “Do you have anything flattering to add about Don to that question?” and he replied that he always does. Then he continued in a more serious vein that he wasn’t allowed to watch gory movies when growing up, but he envied the cool kids in school who watched and loved the Chucky movies. Tilly added, “Yeah, now they’re all losers,” and he replied, also joking, “Yeah. That’s what happens when you watch violent movies.” He also said that he felt very cool auditioning for the series.

As they joked more about Mancini, he playfully told them to stop it. Tilly mentioned seriously that they’re lucky to have Arthur, and that Mancini had told her what a great actor he is. She gave us an example of a scene where he and another actor, Bjorgvin Arnarson (Devon), kiss. She explained, “They have a moment of human connection. And everybody on the set was
weeping because it was so touching.” She also said that she was excited about working with Sawa, whom she loved in “Final Destination.”

A journalist mentioned the 2019 remake, which none of them participated in. He/she wondered if doing the TV series was a way to reclaim it. Tilly answered that the TV series was already being considered long before that. Even though the film did very well, she compares it to the “New Coke vs. Classic Coke” situation. She thinks people will like the series better because they have the original Chucky, Brad Dourif, who thinks that he wouldn’t do the remake without Mancini. Dourif corrected her, though, saying, they didn’t call him, but he would have done that. Mancini joked, “Great story, Jennifer, but it never happened.”

Tilly went on, saying that the wonderful thing about the franchise is how loyal the fans are. She expressed that they’re twice as fanatical as Trekkies. The internet helped her realize how much of an icon Chucky is and how he and her character, Tiffany, are loved worldwide. She’s very grateful to Don for writing her so much into the TV show. She would have been happy to just have a tiny part, but he gave her much more. She gushed, I can’t help but blurt out things like, ‘Thank you, Don.
Thank you for the wonderful scripts. And thank you for putting me in the television series.’ Because his writing is so
amazing.” She also let us know that Brad Dourif’s daughter, Fiona, appears in the second half of the season, and we also see the return of Andy Barclay (Alex Vincent) and Kyle (Christine Elise).

She also added that the show’s story is “just such a beautiful coming-of-age movie. I mean, you kind of don’t even need Chucky because the relationship between Zackary and the other kids is really just you’re rooting for them. You want to know where it goes.” She praises the actors who play the teens.

Another person from the press asked Arthur and Sawa whether they were worried when they signed on to the series whether their characters would be killed or not by Chucky. He/she also wondered if Sawa asked to play twins. Sawa had a funny answer: “Of course, my worry was dying on the show because both my characters are giant assholes.” He agreed that you do hope for the “best death scene possible” or that one of them will live.

Tilly added that she never worries about dying because Tiffany dies in every movie, and yet Mancini keeps bringing her back to life (just as he does with Chucky). She says that the franchise is “magical.”

Mancini jumped in the question to say that they also re-use the same actors frequently in other roles. He claimed, “We were doing that before Ryan Murphy started doing that with the repertoire company he put together on ‘American Horror Story.’ So even if someone dies, they can come back in another role.” He started that with Tilly in the 90’s. She’s gotten killed as both a person and as a doll, and brought back for four movies as well as the series. Brad has also died once or twice in eveyr movie. He half-joked that “if Zack and Devon play their cards right, the sky’s the limit, regardless of what happens to their characters.” Brad Douriff agreed to what he said.

Tilly hinted that a line of dialogue in the series refers to this point. She didn’t want to mention more due to spoilers.
She boasted that she’s been suggesting to Mancini for 30 years that they tell the origin story in a better way than they did in the movies (with younger actors). She and Dourif agreed that the fans will be excited to see this. She added that there is a lot of fan fiction about it — “the two of them before they became dolls.” Tilly teased that Don is the biggest fan of the “Chucky” franchise than anyone. She cites bringing back Andy Barclay as an adult as one example of the lengths Mancini goes to. She thinks that there is a lot more of a “throughline” in their franchise because of using the same actors, and that brings more “emotional impact.” Dourif added that it’s really worked well on “an acting level,” which he finds surprising. He added that he found Alex Vincent to be “hauntingly good.” He suggests that really living with the franchise may have affected him and his work… “Things get inside you and they mean something.” He mentioned that his daughter, who grew up with “Chucky,” did really well, probably because she “grew up in the house of Chucky.” Tilly and Sawa praised his daughter’s acting, which leds to Dourif joking that he done a great job of fishing for those compliments.

Tilly went on some more about how much she loved the first “Chucky” movie she did. She was not interested in it at first, but the writing in the script impressed her as did Brad Dourif’s acting as well as his daughter’s. She mentioned in passing that he was nominated before for an Oscar (For “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” in 1976), which I’d forgotten. She had also never done voice-over, and she said it was a lot of fun, and they let them ad-lib there. She said, enthusiastically, that Brad is brillint. “It wasn’t like, ‘Oh, I’m a doll and you’re a doll. Let’s knock this off and go spend our paycheck.’ He really took it seriously.” She gave an example from their filming of “Bride of Chucky,” where she dies, and she saw him cry in the booth, and she was crying, too. She points out that she’s learned from fans that they’re more often rooting for Chucky instead of his vicims because “They identify with his struggles” and love him.

Arthur answered the question, saying that he doesn’t worry about being killed off because he and Chucky are “buddies” who would “team up.”

Dourif was asked at what age he let Fiona watch his “Chucky” movie and whether he’s surprised that the franchise has lasted so long that she could play major parts in it.

Dourif first answered that no actor thinks that any movies or show will end up that successful. You just have to take it one at a time. It’s never a sure thing. He added that Fiona’s friends in school wanted him to talk like Chucky and do the laugh, so it was already a part of her life. She was very young when she came to the studio with him, when he had to do some additional dialogue. He was screaming and yelling while his character was being burned alive “in agony.” She got very upset and left, so they had to stop, so he could find her and reassure her that it was okay. He added, “So, she had her first kind of traumatic experience around me doing Chucky pretty young.” Tilly then make some jokes about his daughter being terrorized and having to go to therapy.

The last journalist asked Dourif to tell us the process in which he found the voice for Chucky. That’s a great question.

Dourif responded that he’s constantly having to adjust his Chucky voice because as you age, your voice changes. Mancini helps him and tells him what to adjust, such as getting higher in certain places. He added that Chucky originally was from Chicago, but now he sounds more like he’s from New Jersey. He will sometimes watch “Cult of Chucky” and mimic the voice he used there before they shoot again. Mancini said modestly that he doesn’t have to give Dourif any help.

MORE INFO:

In the new CHUCKY television series, an idyllic American town is thrown into chaos after a vintage ‘Good Guy’ doll turns up at a suburban yard sale. Soon, everyone must grapple with a series of horrifying murders that begin to expose the town’s deep hypocrisies and hidden secrets. Meanwhile, friends and foes from Chucky’s past creep back into his world and threaten to expose the truth behind his mysterious origins as a seemingly ordinary child who somehow became this notorious monster. CHUCKY is produced by UCP and executive produced by creator Don Mancini, David Kirschner, Nick Antosca and Alex Hedlund. Harley Peyton will also serve as executive producer. Mancini, who penned the film franchise, wrote the television adaptation, will direct the first episode and serves as showrunner.

CHUCKY is produced by UCP and executive produced by creator Don Mancini, David Kirschner, Nick Antosca and Alex Hedlund. Harley Peyton will also serve as executive producer. Mancini, who penned the film franchise, wrote the television adaptation, will direct the first episode and serves as showrunner.

"Death by Misadventure" Episode 101 -- Pictured: (l-r) Devon Sawa as Logan Wheeler, Zackary Arthur as Jake Wheeler -- (Photo by: Steve Wilkie/SYFY)Zackary Arthur

Jake Wheeler, “CHUCKY”

Zackary Arthur plays Jake Wheeler in the new SYFY/USA Network drama “Chucky.”

Arthur was brought up in Los Angeles amongst a creative family whom all share a passion for the arts. As a young child, Arthur fell in love with the cinema and at the age of 6 quickly found the avenue of acting that he wanted to pursue.

Arthur’s career jumpstarted when he got one of the young leads in the feature film “The Fifth Wave,” opposite Chloë Grace Moretz. His television debut was a recurring role on the Emmy Award-winning Amazon series “Transparent” for all five seasons.

Arthur has subsequently starred in 30 film and television projects, including starring roles opposite Jim Carrey in “Kidding,” Nicholas Cage and Selma Blair in “Mom and Dad,” Natasha Henstridge in “Hero Dog: The Journey Home.” His latest film, “Jill,” is expected to be released shortly.

Brad Dourif

Chucky (Voice), “Chucky”

Brad Dourif does voiceover for the role of Chucky in the new SYFY/USA Network drama “Chucky.”

Dourif, who has been the voice of “Chucky” throughout the film franchise’s long run, won a BAFTA Award and earned an Academy Award nomination for his supporting role in the Oscar-winning film “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” starring Jack Nicholson.

Dourif is also known for his role as Grima Wormtongue on the “Lord of the Rings” franchise. Other film credits include “Halloween,” “Jungle Fever,” “Color of Night,” “Murder in the First,” “Alien: Resurrection

On the TV front, Dourif received an Emmy Award nomination for his supporting role as Doc Cochran on the beloved HBO Western “Deadwood,” which ran for three seasons. Other TV credits include “Once Upon a Time,” “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” “Criminal Minds,” “Psych,” “Law & Order: SVU” and many others.

Devon Sawa

Logan Wheeler / Lucas Wheeler, “Chucky”

Devon Sawa plays Logan and Lucas Wheeler in the new SYFY/USA Network series “Chucky.”

Born in Vancouver, Sawa is an industry veteran having got his start in such films as “Casper,” “Now and Then” and “Little Giants.” He’s co-starred in the horror franchise “Final Destination” as well as “Idle Hands,” “SLC Punk,” “Punk’s Dead” and “Hunter Hunter.”

On the TV side, Sawa has had roles on “Nikita,” alongside Maggie Q, as well as “McGyver,” “Hawaii 5-0” and, coming up, “Magnum PI.”

Sawa lives in Los Angeles, with his wife and two children. He is an avid athlete and trained MMA fighter.

Jennifer Tilly

Tiffany Valentine, “Chucky”

Jennifer Tilly is reprising the role of Tiffany Valentine in the new USA Network/SYFY drama “Chucky.” She has recurred in the Chucky franchise throughout the years, starring in the “Bride of Chucky,” “Seed of Chucky,” “Cult of Chucky,” and “Curse of Chucky.”

Tilly received an Academy Award nomination for her role in Woody Allen’s “Bullets Over Broadway” and earned an American Comedy Award nomination for “Liar Liar,” opposite Jim Carrey.

She has two films set for release: “High Holiday,” a stoner comedy co-starring Cloris Leachman and Tom Arnold, and “Sallywood,” a parable of Hollywood based on a true story. Also this year, Tilly will co-star in the Disney Plus series “Monsters at Work,” reprising her role of Celia, Billy Crystal’s long suffering girlfriend.

Tilly’s film credits include “Bound,” “The Getaway,” “The Fabulous Baker Boys,” “Dancing at the Blue Iguana,” “Bride of Chucky” and “The Doors.”

On the TV side, Tilly has appeared on “Modern Family,” “Hill Street Blues,” “It’s Garry Shandling’s Show,” “Moonlighting,” “Cheers,” “Frasier,” “Drop Dead Diva,” and “CSI.” For the last 11 years, she’s been doing voiceover work for Fox’s “Family Guy.”

Equally at home on stage, Tilly has many theater credits under her belt, including “Tartuffe,” (LA Public Theatre) “Boy’s Life” (LAAT), “Baby With the Bathwater,” (LAPT) and “Vanities,” (Dramalogue Best Actress Award). She received a TheatreWorld Award for Best Newcomer for her performance in Second Stage’s “One Shoe Off” at the Joseph Papp Theatre. On Broadway in 2001, she co-starred in “The Women” with Cynthia Nixon and Kristen Johnson, and then returned to Broadway to co-star in “Don’t Dress for Dinner” in 2012.

She appeared with Miranda Richardson in the critically acclaimed world premiere of Wallace Shawn’s play “Grasses of a Thousand Colors” at the Royal Court Theatre in London. She then reprised her role in the American premiere at the Joseph Papp Theater.

Tilly is a skilled poker player and won a gold bracelet at the World Series of Poker in 2005.

Don Mancini

Executive Producer, “Chucky”

Don Mancini serves at the showrunner and executive producer for the new SYFY/USA Network drama “Chucky.”

With the “Chucky” franchise, Mancini has created one of the most terrifying and iconic horror villains of all time. The redhaired, freckle-face doll possessed by the soul of a serial killer slashed his way into the pop culture zeitgeist in 1988 with the premiere of “Childs Play.” The franchise spawned six sequels, all of which Mancini wrote.

Mancini is not only a standout figure in horror, he is also one of the only franchise creators that has been attached to his creation for more than 30 years, and has no plans of slowing down.

Additionally, Mancini served as a writer and producer on “Hannibal” and “Channel Zero” as well as co-writer on “Tales From the Crypt.”

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"Chucky" poster

Interview with Tim Rozon

TV Interview!

Tim Rozon

Interview with Tim Rozon of “SurrealEstate” on Syfy by Suzanne 7/8/21

I enjoyed speaking with Tim again about this new show! It’s a good show and very enjoyable. He was very nice in the interview as you’ll see. I hope the show is a big success!

Originally, I was supposed to interview his co-star, Sarah Levy, as well, but she had a conflict. Then, after I left the interview room, she was out there, waiting to go to someone else’s interview. I guess her other meeting ended early. So I took the opportunity to say hi and tell her how much I loved her show. When I mentioned that I had watched 8 episodes, she said, “8 episodes? I’ve only seen one!” just like Tim does in this interview! I laughed and said, “Press room…you gotta go to the press room. Someone get this woman access to the show!” She said, “Well, I guess I would have to be a member of the press, then.” I said, “I guess so.” It was so funny that she had the same exact reaction.

We were told to only ask 2 questions (although, as you’ll see, some people asked more than that), but he couldn’t answer my first question because of some secret project that he’s on (or auditioned for), so I asked two more.

See the video!

Suzanne:   Hi, Tim.

Tim:   Hey, how are you?

Suzanne:   All right. When I chatted with you in March, you had blonde hair, and I thought it was for this role, but apparently not. So, what role was it for?

Tim:   Yeah, these are these are things that I cannot talk about.

Suzanne:   Oh, okay. That’s fine. So, let me ask you a simple question. Somebody else will probably ask you, but do you believe in ghosts in real life?

Tim:   Yeah, the answer is is complicated, because had you asked me preproduction of SurrealEstate, I would have said “no.” Postproduction, now after going through it, I’m not so sure anymore. Now, I myself did not experience anything surreal, but we did have a number of guest stars that did have a ghostly experience. They all stayed at the same very famous hotel in Newfoundland, which is supposedly haunted. I won’t say the name of it. Actually, people probably want to go there, because it’s haunted, but I don’t think they’re known as being a haunted hotel, or they want to be known as being haunted. But, yeah, a lot of guest stars, they experienced something. So, that’s a lot of people to be in on some sort of plot or lie to say that there’s something else ghostly among us.

Suzanne:   Wow. Well, maybe it’s the power of suggestion. I don’t know.

Tim:   I don’t know. I don’t know.

Suzanne:   So, the show has some quirky humor in it. Is it all in the script, or do they let the actors put things in?

Tim:   I mean, George Olsen, the showrunner, head writer, creator, he’s one of the smartest people I’ve ever met. He’s also one of the funniest, a really, really dry wit. It makes a lot of sense actually, why they hired Sarah [Levy], because they’re both very smart and very comedic and smart in their comedy. I don’t know if that makes sense, but, yeah, I think he understood how strong Sarah is at comedy. So, Susan had a lot more of it than Luke. Luke went into the comedy a little bit mostly with the Susan stuff, to be honest. Yeah, a lot of credit, I would say, to the cast, the incredible cast that was hired. They’re all great at it. They have the ability to do both the scary stuff and the comedy. So, that’s a great casting, starting with Sarah and then, you know, Adam Korson, Savannah Basley, Tennille Read, Maurice Dean Wint, they just all are able to do it great. So, that’s great. And I find Luke’s kind of like the straight guy of the comedy troupe, so I can do that.

Suzanne:   All right. I love the eight episodes. I can’t wait to see the rest.

Tim:   What? You saw all eight?!

Suzanne:   All eight, yeah.

Tim:   Tell me. I haven’t seen anything.

Suzanne:   Somebody get this man a link to the press site so he can see it. Thank you so much.

Tim:   Thank you.

Question:   So, speaking of guest stars, can you talk about what it was like reuniting with Melanie [Scrofano] for Episode Three?

Tim:   Yeah, it was great, especially because, before the two episodes she directed, she guest starred, which I think was a really great way to do it, because she gets to meet the whole crew before she has to direct. But working with Mel, it’s just, we know each other so well, and it was a real kick to see her in a totally different character than Wynonna, because she’s such a strong actor, too, that she brought none of Wynonna to the new character. It’s an interesting character. I mean, I don’t want to spoil too much, but she has a lot to play with, and she does it quite remarkably. But, yeah, I mean, I love acting with her, and if I could work on every show for the rest of my career with her, I wouldn’t complain.

Question:   Luke has the ability to see and talk to ghosts. Is that something that you wish you could do? Or would you rather have some other supernatural power?

Tim:   No, definitely not; speaking to ghosts is not for me. My favorite superhero is the Silver Surfer. This is a guy who sits alone on a surfboard in the in the cosmos just floating around thinking about life. He’s pretty much a loner. So, that’s where my head’s at if I’m going to go into the superhero realm of things. I definitely don’t want to speak to ghosts. No.

Question:   Working on this series, has it changed your opinion of realtors at all?

Tim:   One hundred percent, yeah. I mean, there’s so much that goes on there that I didn’t know. It was tricky. There’s a whole new lingo to real estate that I was not aware of that I had to learn, and it is a true thing that if a house is haunted, well, implied to be haunted, it will affect the market value of that house. These are real things that I had no idea, but, then, you look into it, and they’re all real. Very cool stuff. Yeah. Very cool stuff. I started looking at houses differently too, like when I came home, I’m like, “Okay, you know what? The bathroom’s in a good spot. Okay, we’re good. We’re good.”

Question:   I love you as Luke, what was it that drew you to be a part of this role?

Tim:   Oh, you know, it was one of those things. I was still filming Wynonna [Earp] when the opportunity came up, and I was screen testing on the weekend for this and doing Zooms with George and Danishka [Esterhazy] and trying to convince them that I was the right Luke. The thing that I think drew me to it was it was so different than Doc Holliday that I was playing at the time, and there was so much work. You know, Doc Holliday really doesn’t talk too much, and Luke, he talks a lot. So, to be honest, I was pretty scared, in a good way, like in a challenge way. I never had any doubt that I could do it, but it was a lot to do, and I was up to the challenge, I’ll say that. I was excited for it. I was excited to get into a new role. I was excited to shave, to be honest.

Question:   Well, that was one iconic mustache.

Tim:   Yeah, great on set, but walking around in real life [is another thing].

Question:   This is a wonderful, because it combines drama; it combines comedy. Was that something that was really exciting for you as well?

Tim:   One hundred percent. I mean, life every day, it throws everything at us. You know, sometimes these television shows they just lean into one way of the way things have to be. A lot of people, including myself, deal with scary things with humor. You know, if I’m scared, I’m the first person that’s gonna be laughing. Like if we’re on a camping trip, and it’s dark, and someone’s telling ghost stories, I’m laughing, because the alternative is just not fun. I’d rather be laughing than be scared.

Question:   What do you think it is then about SurrealEstate that’s gonna make it such a fast fan favorite sci-fi hit?

Tim:   The group, the family dynamic. You know, it’s cool, because we deal with a different, I’ll say, house, every episode, and that house has a different surreality to it. You know, there’s something about that house that quite isn’t right. And at the same time, there’s something about the people who are selling or trying to fix that house that there’s something not right about each and every one of us. And it’s going to be the audience’s kind of joy to figure out what those things are. But I think as a team, when we come together, we really mesh well together. You know, it’s one of those things where it shows you that family is what you make family to be, and I think we find our family. I think they’re are a bunch of loners who don’t really have anybody who kind of found home in each other, and at the same time, they’re dealing with ghosts, perhaps.

Question:   So, you’ve already mentioned that SurrealEstate follows a house of the week type format where there’s a new property to sell each episode, but also sprinkled in are these little pieces of Luke’s backstory, and the viewer gradually sees how layered and complex he is. Can you talk about his personal journey this season?

Tim:   Yeah, I mean, you just did a great job of it, I thought. I’m gonna copy/paste that going forward. Yeah, I mean, it’s complex. He’s got a lot going on, and we’ll will figure out – the layers will start to come away, and you’ll start to figure out who Luke is. I think the first couple episodes people are going to think he’s a certain way, and then later will realize he’s maybe not all business all the time. There is a sensitive side to him. He’s a complex character, which I loved. And I love in the beginning, I think, he’s been through all this stuff before so many times that I think it’s great that the Susan character comes, because Luke, he can take a little joy in watching her go through some of the things that he’s well accustomed to at this point.

Question:   He doesn’t bat an eye when all this crazy stuff happens around him.

Tim:   Yeah.

Question:   You spoke about Susan, and Luke hires her as the newest member at the Roman Agency. Your colleagues there always comment about the high turnover for new hires. What do you think Luke sees in her that would make her a valuable addition to the group?

Tim:   Well, number one, I think they’ve known about each other in this business for quite some time, and I think he has a lot of respect for what she can do as a salesperson. At the end of the day, Luke Roman loves to sell houses. He’s a salesman, and he loves real estate, and so does Susan Ireland. No matter what they’re dealing with, trust me, every episode, they want to sell that house that they’re dealing with. So, I think it’s a lot of mutual respect and kind of what I got into before, he enjoys that he’s kind of been through some of the stuff she’s going through now, I mean, within selling the houses, the specialty houses she was not accustomed to selling before.

Interview Transcribed by Jamie of http://www.scifivision.com

MORE INFO:

Tim Rozon

Luke Roman

Tim’s first major role was playing heartthrob Tommy Quincy opposite Alexz Johnson and Laura Vandervoort for four seasons on the teen drama series “Instant Star” for TeenNick (USA) and CTV (Canada).  He was then cast as the series lead Alex Caine, playing a gang infiltrator, in “Befriend and Betray” for Shaw TV (Canada).   Recent series leads include playing Mutt Schitt on the Emmy juggernaut and Golden Globe winning CBC/Netflix hit comedy “Schitt’s Creek” opposite comedy icons Eugene Levy, Dan Levy, Catherine O’Hara and Chris Elliott; Doc Holliday, the infamous lawman and charismatic gambler, on the fan-fave SyFy series “Wynonna Earp”; Constable Carson Myers, stand up RCMP officer and love interest, on the CBC series “Diggstown” opposite Natasha Henstridge and Vinessa Antoine;  Isaac, lawyer turned outer space rogue, in the SyFy series Vagrant Queen.  Tim is delighted to currently be playing the series leading role of Luke Roman, a real estate agent specializing in haunted homes, on SyFy’s new series “SurrealEstate.”

Tim won a prestigious Gemini Award (the “Canadian Emmy”) for his performance in the series “Flashpoint” (CTV/CBS) and was nominated for another Gemini for work in “Befriend and Betray”.  Tim was thrilled when “Wynonna Earp” won the People’s Choice Award for Best Sci-Fi/Fantasy show in both 2018 and 2020.

Off camera, Tim has many talents in the entertainment business.  He is a voiceover actor, most notably playing a leading role in the animated feature film “The Legend of Sarila”, opposite Christopher Plummer and Genevieve Bujold.  He produced the documentary feature “Shuckers”, about the world of oysters and those who shuck them.  And he is very proud of his work co-writing multiple “Wynonna Earp” graphic novels with creator Beau Smith for IDW.

When not acting, Tim plays the role of restaurateur in Montreal at his hit restaurants Garde Manger and Le Bremner opposite star chef Chuck Hughes

“SurrealEstate” follows real estate agent Luke Roman and an elite team of specialists that handle the cases no one else can: haunted and possessed houses that literally scare would-be buyers away. Researching, investigating and “fixing” the things that go bump in the night, the team works to create closure – and closings – even as they struggle with demons of their own.

  • The first season of SYFY’s scripted drama “SurrealEstate” is set to premiere Friday, July 16 at 10 p.m. EST.
  • SYFY’s “SurrealEstate” hero trailer: HERE
  • The 10-episode, hour-long drama includes “Schitts Creek” alum Tim Rozon and Sarah Levy, Adam Korson, Maurice Dean Wint and Tennille Read.
  • “SurrealEstate” is produced by Blue Ice Pictures and George R. Olson serves as the executive producer and showrunner. Lance Samuels, Daniel Iron, Armand Leo and Danishka Esterhazy also executive produce.
  • Melanie Scrofano is set to direct two episodes following her directorial debut in “Wynonna Earp” Season 4. She joins directors Paul Fox, Danishka Esterhazy and Paolo Barzman.

Proofread and Edited by Brenda

Back to the Primetime Articles and Interviews Page

SurrealEstate poster

Interview with “Van Helsing” stars

TV Interview!

Nicole Muñoz, Jonathan Scarfe and Tricia Helfer

Interview with Nicole Muñoz, Jonathan Scarfe and Tricia Helfer of “Van Helsing” on Syfy by Suzanne 4/12/21

This was a very fun Zoom call with the actors of this Syfy show. I’ve enjoyed watching them on “Van Helsing” and in their other shows as well. It was great to chat with them. This last season of the show is very exciting. I hope you can watch it and enjoy it as well!

Question:   How do you relate to Jack as a person? How do you get into that character and follow her through, I guess, season four and into season five?

Nicole:  I was just saying before, I have some similarities. I think Jack has really helped me grow as a person, and in terms of offering me some inner strength and some confidence, Jack’s stubbornness and tenacity are things that I think come decently naturally to me.

So, at least a fun thing about Jack this season is we kind of get to see a bit more of her humor, which, you know, it kind of is coming out just because of the circumstances. And I do think that I kind of get to put a little bit more of my personality into Jack, this season. And she’s a little bit less on edge. She’s kind of come into a bit more of “this is the reality that we’re dealing with, and now we’re gonna go forth and push on.”

Jonathan:   Oh, I was just saying that Jack has to like find her alpha this year, big time. So, that was, I think, pretty fun for Nicole.

Nicole:  Yeah, and Jonathan helped me with that, immensely. Yeah. It was a lot of “what would Jonathan do?” “What would Axel do?”

Question:   I posed it to Nicole how she relates to her character Jack, and it was sort of open to everybody, how they relate to their character. So, Trisha, how you relate to Dracula, but also how you relate to Jack and how you relate to Nicole, on and off set.

Tricia:  It was definitely a lot of fun getting to work more. I mean, I was only in two episodes last season. In the first episode, Jack and, well, Keeya (King) – I keep saying your names wrong – Violet…were basically knocked out the whole time. So, it was a real treat to get to kind of work with everybody more.

I can’t say I necessarily relate to Dracula myself, but similar to what Nicole said…I do play a lot of very strong characters, and in person, I’m a little bit of an introverted goof. I can come off as cold, because I’m shy quite often. So, it allows me to really kind of just be something that I’m not in my own life. So, sort of learning – I can’t really say I learned much useful from Dracula that would be legal in our society, but certainly playing her does give you a sense of confidence and just sort of a take charge mentality that hopefully I can kind of take that into my own life at some point. Lost our voices a few times, though didn’t we, Nicole?Van Helsing poster season 5

Nicole:  A few, yeah. Thanks Jon.

Tricia:  It’s Jonathan’s fault.

Question:  I’m going to alter my question a little bit so Jonathan can add to it too, but my question was, we don’t really even know if what the Dark One said to them about Vanessa not being their mother is true. I’m kind of still wondering that, but this season, at least at the beginning, you too definitely, I’d say, [since last season] have different interactions and relationships since they’re not, you know, [in the same place] as where they were last season. So, can you kind of talk about how that relationship between the two of you is going to continue this season and change? And then Jonathan, your relationship with – well, you probably don’t really have one with Dracula, but maybe with Jack.

Jonathan:   Yeah.

Nicole:  Wanna try to work around spoilers.

Question:  Just kind of how those relationships will evolve this season.

Nicole:  How my relationship with Dracula evolves this season?

Question:  Yeah.

Nicole:  Is that kind of the question? I would think definitely –

Jonathan:   No [unintelligible] for COVID protocols, it starts there.

Nicole:  Yeah, I think we definitely get to know each other, maybe more than we would have wanted to this season, our characters. I think spoiler-wise, I’m gonna stay very far away from this question, but I do think that Jack gets some answers. Some she likes; some she definitely doesn’t. It’s kind of the feeling of the floor coming out under you, or the rug coming out under you.

Tricia:  For me, Dracula didn’t really know much about anything going on. She’d been in the Dark Realm. So, she’s kind of at the end of the season coming into the world, and she definitely has her confidence shaken a little bit. I mean, she maybe had a little bit too much of an ego, and again, not giving away spoilers, but she starts to question who she can trust and things like that along the way. And throughout her relationships – interactions, not relationships – interactions with the Van Helsings and the other characters in the show – It’s hard to say without spoilers – She comes to realize they’re more of a formidable foe than she maybe gave them credit for. So, if anything, I could say there’s maybe a little bit of a more of a respect for them than she would have thought at the end of season four. Did that give away too much, Jonathan?

Jonathan:  No, I mean, I think that – we were talking about this earlier – I think the writers did an amazing job, but it was, I mean, to not spoil things, but to try and pique some curiosity for the fans, is that, you know, a couple other things you get to discover this season is not just the origin stories of Dracula, which are totally unique to the show; they’ve completely invented their own version of what that would be, but also the origins of the Van Helsings, where they came from, how they evolved, and like how intertwined the two are in a particular way. So, that’s all fully revealed by the end of the season, and I think it’s like the most fun thing about the season, personally, so I’m really excited for fans to check that out and see how they respond to it.

Question:   …Let me just congratulate you all, I mean, five seasons finally coming to an end, which is like, hard to believe. So, let me just ask you all a pretty generic question, Nicole, I’ll start with you, then, we’ll go to Jonathan and Trisha. It’s been five seasons; it’s coming to an end. So, first up, how excited are you that these final episodes are coming out and we get to see the Van Helsings and the Dark One come head to head? Then, of course, how are you feeling? A little nostalgic given the fact that the shows come to an end?

Nicole:  I’m excited to see the reaction of the viewers once they get to watch the final few episodes. I also think the first few episodes of this season are going to be pretty revealing and very exciting to watch the reactions. I will definitely be looking on Twitter this year and reading what everybody has to say about this season, because, I mean, if I’m this excited, everybody’s gonna be even more so when they watch, because I already know what’s about to happen. But just reading the scripts even was a very fun thing to do, and I like rifle through them so quickly. I can only imagine what that feeling would be like for you, Jonathan, being in this thing for five years, because I only hopped on in season four. What do you think?

Jonathan:   Yeah, well, you know, it’s like all things, like this show, you bring it; you’re grinding it out, and there’re ups and downs and the challenges that you kind of face, and then you turn around and five years have gone by, and the thing’s coming to a close. Yeah, you do get definitely a little bit nostalgic thinking, “Oh, gee whiz, this is it. This is goodbye to all these people that have become kind of family and his character that’s kind of become a second skin.” So, yeah, it definitely had a little melancholy to it, for sure, when we came to a close.

Question:   Right and Trisha, let me ask you the same question. What should fans expect on this final season?

Tricia:  Well, knowing that it was the final season, we had the liberty of being able to follow the mythology from the four seasons prior and really give a conclusion to it. So, we faced a lot this year, like the entire world did, so some alterations were made along the way but not affecting the story, which is great. I think with the first three episodes with the origin story of Dracula and how the Van Helsings meet this character, I think is really going to set it up for the rest of the season, because stuff that happens there and stuff the audience will come to learn is really what drives a lot of the rest of the season to its ultimate conclusion, which I think leading up, I think it the last couple of episodes also really ramp up to this, you know, something’s gonna go down. And, you know, being part of it for really only one season, just briefly introduced in season four, of course, it would have been fun to play longer for me, but I understand what Jonathan’s saying then, it’s a little melancholy when you’ve been on a show for five years or something, and it’s like your second skin. When you’re first playing a character, you’re figuring it out and whatever, and then, by season five, you can just go on set and know who the character is. You almost answer in the character’s voice without even thinking about it. I didn’t necessarily have that with Dracula with only being in the one season, but, boy, did I get some fun stuff to play with.

Question:   …You were doing a series that, although it was a supernatural pandemic, it was still a virus like pandemic kind of thing, and you’re doing that for, well, I guess three and a half seasons, four seasons, and then all of a sudden, you’re living through a real pandemic. Did that change your perspective in any way in your characters, in your performance? Did you have maybe more understanding of people who are like hiding inside? So, how did COVID affect your characters is what, I guess, I’m trying to say.

Jonathan:  Well, I mean, yeah, I’d had all kinds of resonance in terms of that, you know, what isolation feels like, and we had just come back from shooting the first three episodes before the initial shutdown happened, and then there was a big question mark as to whether we’re gonna be able to get back to work. Then, we were lucky enough to be able to do that. I think we were one of the first shows back in Vancouver working with all the new COVID protocols. The company did an incredible job setting those up, and there’s a lot of pressure on them being the first show back not to screw it up. So, we’re happy that we didn’t, but…other than the stress that might have been visible in everyone’s eyeballs, I don’t know how much it impacted performance, but it certainly resonated.

Tricia:  I mean, I don’t think it necessarily affected my character per se.

Jonathan:   They didn’t care.

Tricia:  I mean, it did affect shooting for me, because, like Jonathan said, we did the episodes in Slovakia, and then literally all flew home just before the lockdown happened. So, there was a lot of stress for everybody. I really give credit to the production team and studio and network and everything, for getting back up and running as quickly as they did. For me, it really only altered filming in terms of changing schedules. I mean, so many things had to be changed, because you want to have less people on set at a time and less interaction and things like that. So, all my stuff that I had left was consolidated into the very end of the shooting. So, you guys all started shooting way early, and I was down in Los Angeles. So, they all started shooting way earlier, and then, when I came in, it was quarantine, obviously, government quarantine, and then fast and furious shooting everything I had for the rest of the season all in, you know –

Jonathan:   All in a row. Exactly.

Tricia:  All in a row. So, it was –

Jonathan:   Like episodes three through thirteen, all your scenes, all the time, nothing but for the final three weeks of shooting.

Tricia:  It was like a lot to do in the Slovakia episodes, and then nothing, and just sitting there twiddling my thumbs in LA going, “They’re shooting; they’re shooting.” I’m like, I felt so left out of it, but I’m so proud of them for getting back and then just being fast and furious at the end. But, I mean, Dracula is sort of like an enigma. I don’t know she’s – I’m babbling, but it sort of did, without giving away too much, Dracula was sort of feeling a little bit on edge toward the end. So, there was maybe a little isolated that we haven’t seen of her aside from being locked in the Dark Realm. I guess she was locked in the Dark Realm for a long time. That would have been very isolating. Maybe I could have related to that a little bit. I didn’t put too much into it at the time, though, because just everything so new with you just trying to do a good job trying to keep everybody safe and have fun with the character at the same time.

Tricia:  Trying to remember to take your mask off when they say, “Rolling.”

Question:   That happened?

Jonathan:   Oh, yeah.

Nicole:  Sometimes it did, yeah.

Tricia:  Yeah, it happened more than once, because everybody’s in masks. It’s like the first time you put on a mask, you feel really bizarre, but then when everybody around you has a mask on, and you take your mask off, you actually feel bizarre.

Nicole:  And we even incorporated masks into some of our costumes for a little bit there. I think, character-wise, yeah, it may be a little bit of a stretch, but it must have had some sort of impact just having been isolated. I also came back from Slovakia, and then we isolated for a while, and then they started filming. It was like that feeling of, “I miss everybody, and I can’t wait to see everybody.” Then, once we started filming again, it made those scenes of reunion or scenes with some intimacy in it just that much more important and impactful. And that like yearning for it was more already at the surface and more accessible, I guess, as an actor.

Tricia:  I don’t think Dracula gets to hug anyone, but it was like, if you got to hug anybody on set, you’re like, “I’m not letting go!”

Nicole:  Yeah. It’s like, “Jack, don’t let go.”

Suzanne:   I really enjoyed the three episodes they let us watch… that was great. Without spoilers, obviously, do you think that fans will enjoy the ending?

Tricia:  I do. I was the most excited I’ve been about the show in ages was when I read those first three skip scripts for this season. I thought “Wow.” I had no idea how the writers were going to try and figure out a way to bring the thing to a conclusion, and I think they exceeded all expectations and in terms of what they came up with. So, I’m really excited to see the fan reaction to it.

Nicole:  Yeah, the first three episodes play out of like a mini movie, and, yeah, I think it’s going to be very satisfying for everybody to watch, and it’s going to be quite the launching board for the rest of the season.

Tricia:  That’s exactly what I was just gonna say, Nicole. It’s a launching board for the rest of the season. So, even though they are like a little mini movie and set in Transylvania, where the rest of the season isn’t, it really does set up what the characters are going through, and knowledge and experience and questions to figure things out. But the following episodes are really where all the mythology from the first four seasons really gets layered into the very end, and there’s a nugget at the very end in the finale that I just think is so fun…that I think is just going to have some fans drop their chins to the floor.

Question:   This is for the entire cast. How would you describe season five in three words?

Jonathan:   Season five in three words, wow. “Big questions answered.”

Nicole:  “The final season.”

Tricia:  …I want to look up my notes for the other day. What did I say?

Nicole:  Had I done my press homework, I would have actually had the answer to this.

Tricia:  Family is one of my words. Family, [resilience], and teamwork? I’m trying to stay away from like bloody and gashy and death.

Jonathan:   Jaw freaking dropping.

Here is the video version of it.

Interview Transcribed by Jamie of http://www.scifivision.com

MORE INFO:

Van Helsing is set in the near future, where vampires have risen and taken control. Vanessa Van Helsing is humanity’s last hope, as her unique blood composition gives her the ability to turn vampires human. With this secret weapon, Vanessa becomes a prime target for the vampires. Van Helsing comes from the producers of Fargo and Hell on Wheels. Jonathan Lloyd Walker serves as showrunner.

In the fifth and final season of “Van Helsing,” Vanessa, Violet, and Jack will risk it all to finally bring an end to the Dark One once and for all. The Van Helsings must figure out ways to escape and evade the various obstacles in their path to prevent them from their mission, leading to an epic final showdown between the Van Helsings and the Dark One. Who will win the battle between light and dark?

Jonathan Scarfe

Axel, “Van Helsing”

VAN HELSING -- Season:1 -- Pictured: Jonathan Scarfe as Axel Miller -- (Photo by: Brendan Meadows/HELSING S1 PRODUCTIONS/Syfy)

Multiple award-winning actor Jonathan Scarfe stars as Axel, a Marine ordered to guard the body of Vanessa Van Helsing.

Scarfe, a seasoned actor, producer, director and writer with over 20 years of experience, has been nominated six times for the Gemini Awards (the Canadian Emmys) and won twice for his work in “The Sheldon Kennedy Story” and the mini-series “Above and Beyond.” He is also the recipient of two Leo Awards for his work on “Hell on Wheels” and “Love on the Air.” As a director, he wrote and shot the multiple award-winning short film “Speak” with his wife Suki Kaiser.

In 2012, Scarfe embarked on a two-and-a-half-year sailing odyssey, entirely off the grid, with his wife and two children. The trip would ultimately encompass a circumnavigation of the North and South Pacific oceans and over 18,000 sea miles.

Nicole Muñoz was born and raised in Vancouver, Canada. She began her acting career at the age of four. With over fifteen years experience Nicole has garnered over 40 credits including beloved shows such as Once Upon A Time, Supernatural, The 100, Defiance and a lead role in SYFY’s Van Helsing.

Tricia Helfer is a Canadian cover girl model-turned-actress who has developed her resume beyond the catwalk to include many diverse roles highlighting her versatile and natural screen presence. Best known as the face of the series, and for her Leo award-winning lead performance as the humanoid, Cylon ‘Number Six’ in the critically acclaimed Syfy series, Battlestar Galactica (2004), Helfer has since gone on to book leading roles on a wide variety of networks. Tricia currently stars in FOX’s “Lucifer”, switching gears from the role as Lucifer’s mother Charlotte, to an attorney by the same name.

Prior to “Lucifer,” Tricia was recurring in season two of the Playstation & Sony Picture TV series, “Powers.” Just before that, Helfer also played the lead of the Syfy channel’s original miniseries “Ascension” co-starring Brian Van Holt. In early 2014, Helfer starred as the lead of the ABC series, “Killer Women”. The Sofia Vergara-produced series followed beautiful badass Molly Parker (Helfer), in the notorious Texas Rangers frontier patrol, as she pursued justice despite being embroiled in a continuous fight for her peers’ respect.

Born in Donalda, Alberta, Canada, Helfer launched her modeling career at age 17, and erupted into an international superstar after winning the Ford Models’ Supermodel of the World Contest in 1992. Her modeling credits include appearances in high-end ad campaigns for Giorgio Armani, Ralph Lauren, Versace, Givenchy, and Dolce & Gabbana as well as covers for national publications such as ELLE, Cosmopolitan, Marie Claire, Flare and Vogue.

In 2002, Helfer turned her focus to acting, moving to Los Angeles and quickly earning a guest star spot on the second season finale of “C.S.I.: Crime Scene Investigation.” The following year she earned her break with “Battlestar Galactica,” achieving a remarkably fast and successful transition into acting. During her hiatus from “Battlestar Galactica,” Helfer portrayed the legendary Farrah Fawcett in NBC’s film, “Behind the Camera: The Unauthorized Story of Charlie’s Angels.” She furthered expanded her portfolio by starring as ‘Stephanie Jacobs’ opposite Dennis Hopper and Billy Zane in the independent feature “Memory,” and later starred alongside LeeLee Sobieski in another independent, “Walk All Over Me,” which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Helfer returned to the small-screen in 2008, joining the cast of the USA Network’s hit series, “Burn Notice” for a multi-episode arc. The next year she filmed recurring guest spots on the award-winning CBS comedy, “Two and a Half Men,” while appearing on Fox’s crime shows “Chuck,” and “Lie to Me.” In 2010, Helfer booked a series regular role on the ten-episode arc of Jerry Bruckheimer’s “Dark Blue,” starring opposite Dylan McDermott and went on to do a variety of terrific roles on series such as “Suits,” on USA Network, “Key and Peale,” “The Librarians,” “Community,” “Chuck,” “Jeremiah” and “Franklin & Bash,” among others.

In addition to her vast array of television roles, Tricia starred in the film, “A Beginner’s Guide to Endings,” with Harvey Keitel, Scott Caan, and JK Simmons and ;ater, went on to star in “Authors Anonymous” with Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting. Next up, is another lead role in thriller, “Isolation” co-starring Luke Malby, a film that will portray the true events of a couple vacationing in the Bahamas. The getaway quickly spirals out of control, forcing the couple into survival mode.

Adding to her impressive resume, Helfer has done prolific voiceover work in mega-hit video game franchises including, playing the roles of Commander Veronica Dare in Halo: ODST, EDI in Mass Effect 2 and 3, Sarah Kerrigan in Blizzard Entertainment’s StarCraft II: Wings of Liberty, for which she won the 2010 VGA for Best Performance by a Human Female, as well as in StarCraft II: Heart of the Swarm. She also showcased her voice talent in animated productions, “Green Lantern: First Flight,” a Cartoon Network TV movie, on Disney XD’s “The Spectacular Spiderman”, and on Disney XD’s TRON: Uprising.

In addition to acting, Helfer continues to support as many causes as she can, as she strongly believes in giving back. Tricia supports the Humane Society of United States, Best Friends Animal Society, AmFAR, PETA, Kitten Rescue and Richmond Animal Protection Society.

Tricia, who has dual citizenship in the US and Canada, and resides in Los Angeles.

Proofread and Edited by Brenda

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Nicole Muñoz, Jonathan Scarfe and Tricia Helfer

Interview with Corey Reynolds and Alan Tudyk

TV Interview!

Interview with Corey Parker and Alan Tudyk of "Resident Alien" on Syfy

Interview with Corey Reynolds and Alan Tudyk of “Resident Alien” on Syfy by Suzanne 3/23/21

NBC/Universal had a wonderful virtual junket last week, where we were fortunate to interview many of their stars. This particular interview was supposed to just be with Corey Reynolds, but Alan Tudyk showed up as well (much to our delight). I didn’t actually get to ask them any of my questions, but you can see the other reporters’ questions and hear my exchange with them. It was pretty funny in parts.  This is a great show, and I’m so happy that they’re going to have a second season.

Don’t miss the season one finale Wednesday, March 31, 10/9c.

Here’s the transcript of our interview, which doesn’t include my own comments. Make sure you watch the video!

Question:   Good morning, Cory. Good morning, Alan, thank you so much for joining us. [I’m] a big fan of the show and such a big fan of you Alan. I don’t know if anybody else could have ever played this character. Oh my god. Can talk a little bit about that. You’ve played a lot of weird characters, inhuman characters, but this one, even in your human form, from the first episode and the evolution and everything, it was just mind blowing to see that. What’s your process and stuff like that, and how do you still humanize your characters while being so inhuman?

Alan:   Hmm. I think a few things, I guess. You know, you have to start with you, when you act in anything. That’s the best way to go. Whatever you’re doing, it all goes through the filter of you as a human, you as an actor. Then you add things on that are unlike you. Harry’s an alien, and he’s using this body as a sort of meat puppet. He’s having to learn how to move this thing around from the inside. He’s Jim Henson’s hand, which was going to be the title, and I really think it should have been. So, I think that way, sort of as if he’s an alien peering out through the eyes of this character. Like just immediately, if you start thinking yourself that way, that you’re like something just sitting at the rim of the eyes looking out, it’s creepy, and you end up becoming a little creepy when you put your head space there.

And it’s just adding on all those little things that are given to you in the script. We’ve got great scripts, and because everything’s a first for Harry, specifically for Harry, he doesn’t know anything about being a human. That gives me a lot of leeway to go as far as I want to in many directions, because he’s curious. He’s curious, like a child, and can be surprised very easily. There’re really very few things you can’t accept about his behavior. He can do some really crazy stuff, and you can go, “Well, that makes sense.” So, it’s a it’s a fun character in that there’s a lot of leeway, a lot of leeway there.

Question:   Right. You want to kill the child, and I’m still like, “Sure, go ahead.”

[laughter]

Question:   Which is what I’m saying. I was surprised in the writing and your performance in that sense. Like, how can you actually keep doing that and still root for this character, which I really think is a huge cheers to your performance and [the] writing for that matter. Absolutely. So, congratulations.

Cory, you are so damn hilarious from your first appearance. It’s mind-blowing. I mean, not many people can just go ahead and be the Big Black and still, you know, not feel offensive or feel like –

Corey:   I feel offensive.

Question:   But I want to get to that. Initial[ly], it’s a comedy, and you’re a fantastic actor, but the show kind of taps into this guy’s confidence in being surrounded by white and Native people, but they don’t have the confidence and everything, keeping it so funny, but still kind of acknowledging [it]. So, can you talk a little bit about that? The race aspect of this issue where there’s a fantastic character so confident in himself, but doesn’t acknowledge – that seems ignorant of, like, you know, the race. I’m not sure.

Corey:   Yeah, you know, I had a question come up at our New York City Comic-Con a of couple years ago about that. I had one of the interviewers ask me, “Did Big Black have any concerns about being in a mountain town surrounded by all of those white folks?” I believe that was the question that was asked. I think my response was something along the lines of, “If he does, he hasn’t mentioned it to me.” [laughs] I think, obviously, there is a component of race there, and it’s hard to ignore in the climate that we’re in, but I think one thing we’re going to come to discover about Sheriff Mike, about Big Black, is that – at least for me, and I’m not even really sure if I’ve discussed this as much with Chris, because, we’ve played around with the idea and talked about it, but we haven’t really like delved into it. I think, for me, personally, Mike feels like the sheriff’s department in his hands when it comes to that race component is the safest place for it to be, because despite his exterior, I believe that he sees police work as being 90% communication and 10% enforcement. I think that as long as he’s in that driver’s seat, when it comes to the sheriff’s office, he knows that everyone in that town is going to be treated fairly. He knows that everyone in that town is going to be given equal credence, and no one’s going to be mistreated based on their creed, based on what they look like, who they love, or how they pray. I think that his efforts to fit in, fueled by his insecurities of fitting in, have been what has really fueled his dynamic and downfall with Deputy Liv (Elizabeth Bowen). Mike is trying desperately to prove himself, and we’re going to begin to discover more and more what that’s rooted in and why he is that way.

…Hey, can I just add, one key thing about about Alan as well, when we talk about nobody else being able to play this role, like it’s hard to do scene work with Alan, because he’s so fucking funny and his embodiment of this character. If you watch the show, there’re two things, two little moments, little itty bitty things when he first shows up at the crime scene. He’s holding his hands in the position of his second pair of hands, and he’s like, “This is awesome.” Then, most recently, in the episode where his wife is played by Elvy, [she] is laying in bed with him, and he’s laying there on his back with his hands. You know, that type of commitment to letting that character exist is kind of like always running in the background for him. So, you have the things that we’re seeing in the foreground, but then there’s also this undercurrent of Harry that’s there that’s always being played and suddenly found all over the place. It’s just, he’s great man. Seriously, l’m constantly blown away by Alan. He knows this though. I mean, he knows I am.

Alan:   Thank you very much.

Question:   Do you do the motion capture for the alien?

Publicist:   Sorry, guys, we have to we have to let someone else have a have a turn because we’re gonna have to wrap it [up].

Question:   This is such a hybrid. You have the mystery of sci-fi. It’s from a comic. Is there ever a point where you’re in a scene and you’re like, “What’s the tone here? How do I approach this?” to get the most out of it, you know, to to make the scene really pop? Do you ever have an issue with that?

Question:   Alan?

Alan:   I don’t. There are times we finish a thing in a scene and I’ll say, “This is a one-hour drama, everybody, a one-hour drama,” because it’ll be on the heels of something so very comic. I think Chris [Sheridan] has done a great job in creating a world that can hold all of it. That is no easy feat, and when it doesn’t work, it’s so easy for it not to work, and I think he’s done a good job of of getting it to work.

When we did the pilot, that was something that we all talked about, just play it like a drama, you know, play it like a drama and the comedy will be there. I think we do that for the most part, but again, there’s leeway to be a little bit – You know, there’s a scene where Elvy, or my wife that I didn’t know I had, she’s gone downstairs and she’s opened up the freezer, and she’s taken out steaks, and she’s made steaks, and I’m saying, “Where did you get those steaks?” She says, “I got them downstairs.” And I’m going to say, “It’s closed; that door is closed,” and I say, “That door is open.” I had two takes where I said, “That door is open,” or “That door is open!” or something like that. Then, the third take, I screamed it, and that’s the one they used. So, you know, they use [it] at their discretion also. They have options. But in the world, there’s this alien who has new emotions, and he’s starting to feel he doesn’t have a great governor on his emotions. His feelings can just come up and come up in a rush. So, you can excuse it away that it becomes a very comic “Open!” screaming moment. So, I hope that it holds it all, and we do – I think, Cory, your stuff is so funny. You have the same thing. Right?

Corey:   Yeah, it’s trying to find a way to keep these ungrounded characters somewhat grounded. You know what I mean? The sheriff is definitely over the top, but truth be told, listen, I grew up in Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, Chesterfield County, just outside of Richmond, and a lot of my family was up in Dodgeville County. I have an uncle named Flip. You understand what I’m saying? So, you know, I had an uncle named Butt Cut, so I know folks, not quite like Mike, but he’s not that foreign to me. Maybe his attitude is much bigger, but the person he is, is pretty – I know this guy; I know guy.

And as far as getting the scenes and stuff together, we block shoot. So, we shoot two episodes at a time, so it does require in moments – Like we’ll be shooting something from episode two and three, literally, in the same day. We might even be using the same location but having totally different emotions from scene to scene, because they’re two different episodes. So, we do have to get a reminder every now and again from our directors, or Chris, or our script supervisor, of what’s happened between what are we coming directly out of [and] what are we bringing into this moment, which is pretty standard overall, but when you’re block shooting, it does create a unique kind of challenge to make sure you’re staying in the right moment for the right scene.

Alan:   And I don’t do motion capture on this show. Just a heads up to answer that question from before.

Here is the video version of it.

Interview Transcribed by Jamie of http://www.scifivision.com

Check out Jamie’s interview with Corey Reynolds!

MORE INFO:

Read Our Review!

‘RESIDENT ALIEN’ BLOOPER REEL & DELETED SCENE REVEALED
Season Finale Airs Wednesday, March 31 at 10/9c
In advance of the season finale, we’re excited to share the hysterical season 1 blooper reel and deleted scene from episode 7.

Based on the Dark Horse comic, SYFY’s RESIDENT ALIEN follows Harry, an alien played by Alan Tudyk (“Rogue One,” “Firefly”) that crash lands on Earth and passes himself off as a small-town human doctor. Arriving with a secret mission to kill all humans, Harry starts off living a simple life… but things get a bit rocky when he’s roped into solving a local murder and realizes he needs to assimilate into his new world. As he does so, he begins to wrestle with the moral dilemma of his mission and asking the big life questions like: “Are human beings worth saving?” and “Why do they fold their pizza before eating it?”

From UCP, in association with Amblin TV and Dark Horse Entertainment, RESIDENT ALIEN was adapted to television by executive producer Chris Sheridan (“Family Guy”). Mike Richardson (“Hellboy”) and Keith Goldberg (“The Legend of Tarzan”) of Dark Horse Entertainment (“The Umbrella Academy”), and Justin Falvey (“The Americans”) and Darryl Frank (“The Americans”) of Amblin TV also executive produce. David Dobkin (“Wedding Crashers”) executive produced and directed the pilot. “Resident Alien” also stars Sara Tomko, Corey Reynolds, Alice Wetterlund and Levi Fiehler.

Hashtag: #ResidentAlien

SYFY PICKS UP DARK HORSE COMICS’ ‘RESIDENT ALIEN’ TO SERIES

breaking news | May 30, 2019

Alan Tudyk Stars in Series from UCP, with Chris Sheridan Executive Producing Alongside Dark Horse Entertainment and Amblin TV

David Dobkin Executive Produced and Directed the Pilot

NEW YORK, NY – February 28, 2019 — SYFY today announced the series pickup of RESIDENT ALIEN, a comedic drama based on the popular Dark Horse comics series by co-creators Peter Hogan and Steve Parkhouse. From Universal Content Productions (UCP), in association with Amblin TV and Dark Horse Entertainment, the series was adapted to television by executive producer Chris Sheridan (“Family Guy”). Mike Richardson (“Hellboy”) and Keith Goldberg (“The Legend of Tarzan”) of Dark Horse Entertainment (“The Umbrella Academy”), and Justin Falvey (“The Americans”) and Darryl Frank (“The Americans”) of Amblin TV will also executive produce. David Dobkin (“The Judge”) executive produced and directed the pilot.

RESIDENT ALIEN is a twisted and comedic fish-out-of-water story that follows a crash-landed alien named Harry (Alan Tudyk) who, after taking on the identity of a small-town Colorado doctor, slowly begins to wrestle with the moral dilemma of his secret mission on Earth — ultimately asking the question, “Are human beings worth saving?”

Tudyk (“Doom Patrol,” “Rogue One”) is joined by series regulars Sara Tomko (“Once Upon A Time”), Corey Reynolds (“The Closer”), Alice Wetterlund (“People of Earth”) and Levi Fiehler (“Mars”). The series will begin production in Vancouver this summer.

About SYFY
SYFY is a global, multiplatform media brand that gives science fiction fans of all kinds a universe to call home. Celebrating the genre in all its forms, SYFY super-serves passionate fans with original science fiction, fantasy, paranormal and superhero programming, live event coverage and imaginative digital and social content. The brand is powered by SYFY WIRE (www.syfy.com), the premier portal for breaking genre news, insight and commentary. SYFY is a network of NBCUniversal, one of the world’s leading media and entertainment companies. NBCUniversal is a subsidiary of Comcast Corporation.

About UCP
UCP is a premium content studio that operates with a highly curated indie sensibility, while simultaneously leveraging the power and scale of NBCUniversal. As fierce advocates for creators with an eclectic point of view, the UCP team develops pioneering original programming with partners such as Amazon (“Homecoming”), Netflix (“The Umbrella Academy”), Hulu (“The Act”) and YouTube (“Impulse”). In addition, UCP produces high-caliber content for NBCU Cable networks, including Bravo (“Dirty John”), USA (the Emmy® and Golden Globe®-winning drama “Mr. Robot,” the Golden Globe nominated “The Sinner,” “The Purge” and “Suits” ) and SYFY (“Happy!,” and “The Magicians”). UCP’s content library also features 800 hours of award-winning and critically-acclaimed content, including the Emmy Award-winning “Monk,” the Peabody and Hugo Award-winning “Battlestar Galactica” and the Emmy nominated “Psych.”

About Amblin Television:
Amblin Television, a long-time leader in quality programming, is a division of Amblin Partners, a content creation company led by Steven Spielberg. Amblin Television’s co-presidents, Darryl Frank and Justin Falvey, oversee all development, production and programming for the company. Amblin Television currently has thirteen projects in various stages of production including “Bull” and “Tommy” for CBS, “Roswell, New Mexico” for the CW, “The Haunting of Bly Manor” for Netflix – the follow-up chapter to The Haunting of Hill House, “Amazing Stories” for Apple, “Halo” for Showtime, a straight-to-series order for “Brave New World” from USA Network, “Cortes and Moctezuma” for Amazon, “Animaniacs” for Hulu, “Why We Hate” for Discovery, “Resident Alien” for SYFY, and the documentary films “Natalie Wood: What Remains Behind” for HBO and “Laurel Canyon” for Epix.

Some of Amblin Television’s previous credits include the Emmy and Golden Globe Award-winning drama “The Americans” for FX, Emmy-nominated HBO movie “All The Way” starring Bryan Cranston, “Smash” for NBC, “Under the Dome” for CBS, “Falling Skies” for TNT, “The Borgias” and “The United States of Tara” for Showtime, and “Las Vegas” for NBC.

About Dark Horse Entertainment:
Dark Horse Entertainment was spun off from founder Mike Richardson’s Dark Horse Comics in 1992. The company’s first major hits—THE MASK and TIMECOP — were based on Richardson’s creations and DHE has since produced over 30 films and series, including an Emmy Award–winning documentary, MR. WARMTH: THE DON RICKLES PROJECT. Recent projects include THE LEGEND OF TARZAN with Warner Bros., the DARK MATTER television series for Syfy network and POLAR, adapted from Victor Santo’s noir graphic novel starring Mads Mikkelsen (Rogue One) at Netflix. Current projects include a reboot of Mike Mignola’s HELLBOY starring David Harbour (Stranger Things) directed by Neil Marshall (The Descent), and THE UMBRELLA ACADEMY, a Netflix original series based on the comics created by Gerard Way (My Chemical Romance) and Gabriel Ba.

Proofread and Edited by Brenda

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Interview with Corey Parker and Alan Tudyk of "Resident Alien" on Syfy

Interview with Tim Rozon

TV Interview!

Tim Rozon of "Wynonna Earp" on Syfy

Interview with Tim Rozon of “Wynonna Earp” on Syfy by Suzanne 2/22/21

This was a fun interview because he really loves to talk about the show, and really appreciates the fans. I hope they get another season!

Here’s the video of our interview

Question: You had some big gaps in the scheduling. Were you confident you’d be back for this? Or were you just relieved? How did you feel about that?

Tim: You know, it’s so crazy. I started Schitt’s Creek before I started Wynonna Earp. Schitt’s Creek wrapped season six, six seasons before we wrapped the fourth season of Wynonna Earp, just to show you how long it was to film that show. Yeah, I don’t know. There was almost a year hiatus between season three and four that we weren’t sure if we were coming back, and then we finally did, and then the global pandemic hit. So, we only got halfway through the season, and then to come back, I wasn’t sure, but if I was ever sure about anything, it’s kind of with Wynonna that it was gonna get done. There’s just something so special about this show. Then, yeah, it finally happened. It took five years, I think, maybe a little longer, five and a half years, to finally finally get there. Well, we eventually got there.

Question: Do you feel like your character got a satisfying ending, and have you been able to let him go yet?

Tim: You know, I love the the ending of the show. If that is truly the way it ends, I loved it. So, especially for my character, I remember telling Emily just, “Wow.” I mean, she’s wonderful, and as a showrunner and a writer, she’s very open. She’s there for you if you need her, but I’m not one of those people who are really – I never bug her. I never ask for things. You know, I’m not that person. I just put my trust in what they do, and I perform, and I understand that I have a job to do. You know, sometimes my character is going to do some of the things that aren’t so great, man, and I understand that’s just that’s part of it. But the way it all came together, I just remember telling Emily, just, “Thank you. I mean, I thought you did an incredible job with this character. You showed him so much love and compassion and growth.” And it was really touching.

How do I say goodbye to him? I made sure to, though while we were filming the second part of Season Four, just because you never know. It took us so long to get there, to finally film Season Four, to complete it. It almost never happens twice. So, yeah, I was aware of it the entire time, so I tried to literally enjoy every second that I possibly could with that character. It’s difficult now that it’s more real than ever, that the show most likely isn’t coming back. To say goodbye to that character is difficult. I think most people understand that it’s one of my favorite characters I’ve ever played. He just has a special place in my heart, the old cowboy. So yeah, it’s tough.

Question: So, last we saw everyone, our hearts were cheering for Waverly and Nicole but breaking for Wynonna and Doc. So, how would you describe those two relationships in these final episodes? What are the chances of maybe two weddings before it’s over?

Tim: You know, this love is complicated, and it comes in different shapes and forms and people love differently, and they love different things about other people and themselves. You know, it’s funny, I just feel like Doc has come so far by Season Four, and he’s really done with the old life. You know, I think he understands that sometimes to move forward, we’ve got to let the old ways die. I think as a society we’re learning that. And I think Doc, he finally gets that it’s time to let go.

It’s unfortunate, because I don’t think Wynonna has yet, but Wynonna has the burden of the curse. Well, she did at least. So, before it was tough. You couldn’t really say anything, because she was the one who had the burden. Anyway, at the end of the day, it was Wynonna who had to save the day. So, you couldn’t really say “Hey, let’s stop and grow a family and grow barley in the little farm,” like Doc wanted, because well, she had the burden of the curse. But now, the curse is gone, and for him, he just sees it as, “Why are you fighting?” Did you somehow come to love the fight? Is that what it’s become?” You know? Will she ever let go? Because they can never be together if she doesn’t let go too. So, I don’t know. We’ll see. We’ll see what happens.

Well, Waverly and Nicole, that’s just magic. Those are those stories we hear about, just, you know, magic. It exists. True love like that does exist. I mean, that’s the beauty of love and life. Doc and Wynonna is a little closer to real life. Maybe not. If you’re in a relationship, to be honest, like Doc and Wynonna’s, you should probably get out. [laughs] Probably not the healthiest.

Suzanne: So, you said that you think it’s the end of the season? Have you heard anything about the possibility of it continuing?

Tim: I haven’t heard anything. I’m always the last to know. People think that we know stuff. I don’t know. I’d know, honestly, a little before anybody if we ever came back, because I’d have to grow the mustache. You know, no one [unintelligible] grow a mustache. So, yeah, I don’t know; I don’t know anything.

I’ll say this, and this is the thing that makes the whole process easier for me, the only thing at the end of the day that I really care about is the Earpers, the fandom, and the way that the story ends. Now, if it ends, I’m very proud of it, and I’m very happy, and I think everybody’s going to be very happy. Now, if it continues on, I’m 100% sure that Emily and her team can write another amazing story, and there’re other stories and other avenues to go down, other than telling these stories. You know what I mean? Even if Doc doesn’t come back, you could tell the (Rachel) Valdez story. You know, there’re so many great stories you could tell and everything, but, for me, the main thing and the most important thing is I’m really proud and happy that I think the Earpers are going to be happy. That’s what makes me happy, to be honest, the most, because they deserve it the most. They’re the reason we got as far as we ever did, and there’s no doubt. So, that’s the one part that makes it all kind of okay, because I know that they’re still gonna be happy.

Question: Over four seasons, how is it been playing somebody who’s a lot older than you look, or at least who has the sensibilities of somebody who’s a lot older than you look?

Tim: Yeah, does he have too many sensibilities? I don’t know, it’s interesting. We didn’t play the man out of time as much as I would have loved to, and I did find some moments early on in season one to really play it. I remember I was doing things like [that]. I remember, specifically, there was an episode where I went to where all the broken cars were, where Bobo lived, and Doc went to meet Bobo whenever Bobo was camping there. I remember, I got into a car with the Levi character, and I got in the car, and I acted like it was the first time in a car. I remember the director, Ron Murphy’s, like, “Tim, what the hell are you doing?” I’m like, “Well, Doc Holliday, he’s never been in a car before. He wouldn’t know.” He’s like, “Yeah, dude, we’re not playing that. We don’t have time for that.” You know, he’s like, “He’s figured out stuff right away.” He’s just like, “You got to figure that he’s figured out stuff.” Yeah, so we never played the matter of time stuff. So, I don’t know how sensible he is, because I don’t know how much he’s learned from – You know, I think he’s less crazy than he should be, to be honest, because if we’re being honest, he was stuck there for 180 years in solitude. I’m pretty sure that would drive me nuts. So, I think the old cowboy did pretty good, to be honest.

Question: So, you’re not playing the inclination to go up to every person you meet and go, “Talk to me; talk to me! I was by myself for 180 years. Say something.”

Tim: No. And I mean, had I wanted to play it, I think they would have told me not to, so, no.

Question: Both Schitt’s Creek and Wynonna Earp have tremendous fan bases. I was just wondering how life has changed for you over the last six or so years?

Tim: Oh, I mean, just in the best way possible, and in just the sense of family and community that I’ve met in this thing. Meeting people virtually is one thing, and it’s amazing, but some of my most favorite memories in the past years have been meeting people in person, the fans of both those shows. I’m happy you said that, because Schitt’s Creek, you know, everybody talks about the Earpers, but the Creekers, man, they’re amazing, same energy. I’ve gone to Australia, and I’ve met Earpers and Creekers together, and they’ve all been just very supportive and amazing. It’s immediate. The most amazing thing is, especially with the Earper communities, we don’t need to talk about it. We already understand; it’s a symbiotic thing. It’s almost like, every time we’re seeing each other, it’s like saying, “Thank you.” It’s like, “Thank you.” “But thank you,” and both people meaning it. I don’t know, in a lot of ways, it just made me conscious to make sure that I’m just the best version of myself that I can be.

I’ve seen some amazing things, just amazing things. I’ve seen a lot of people come out for the very first time and the courage that it takes to do that. I’ve seen just fathers that came to the cons to support their daughter for the first time. You know, just stuff. It’s just amazing stuff that’s bigger than the show at the end of the day. That’s why I said I’m happy that if it is over, that part’s never over, the Earpers. It’s not over. The community and everything they built, it’s bigger than the show. It’s better than the show. It’s more important than the show. The show was amazing. It was great, but at the end of the day, we are fighting demons, pretending to be – you know what I mean? What these people created, it’s incredible, and I feel lucky that I got to be a part of that and into their world. It’s so weird, because they feel lucky that they got let to ours, but it’s so obvious to me that it’s the other way around. Yeah, it’s very special, very special communities, and the same with the Creekers. I just did a Zoom meeting with Karen for a charity for a couple of Creek fans, and it was supposed to be a 15 minute zoom call. I think we went almost two hours just chatting. But, honestly, we’re just chit chatting, and it was great.

Question: Speaking of Zoom, how is it working with the COVID protocols? How was shooting the second part?

Tim: You know, it was very difficult. In a weird way, it was the busiest year I’ve had in my life, actually, shooting during COVID, because I went directly from the last day of Wynonna Earp, getting on a plane and flying and starting a new show called Surreal Estate four days later. I just had to test I think six times within those three days that I was off. Yeah, it was very interesting. It was difficult.

I felt for the crew a lot. There were groupings at first, and at first, Wynonna was kind of tough, because we were the first show back in Canada. So, there was a lot of eyes on us, a lot of pressure. And for me, that was a lot of responsibility to make sure that we got this season done. When we first got out to Alberta, the numbers were kind of low. I remember some of the rest of the cast were like, “Oh, let’s go for dinner,” or “We can go for lunch.” I’m like, “I’m not going anywhere. I just quarantined at home for three months. If you think I’m coming here to start work and put this entire production at risk of how lucky we are, you’re crazy.” And they’re all like, “Oh my god.” But nobody went for lunch either. You know what I mean? It’s like, it’s the crews job. The Earpers are waiting for that season. It was just too important. There was just so much responsibility to be responsible, because the actual part of it, the actors, we’re the luckiest ones, again. We’re the only ones that get to take our masks off, even if it’s just to film or when you go to your little area after your mask is off. The crew, that mask is on from seven in the morning until 8:30 at night when we wrap. It’s difficult.

I didn’t like the groupings, because we never had that on Wynonna Earp. I’m friends with the crew as much as I am friends with Melanie, you know what I mean? Like, on the weekend, I’m going to equally hang out, go have brunch with the grip, because it doesn’t matter for me, but the groupings kind of made it like “Well, only Group B can talk to Group B. Well, what group are you in?” It’s kind of like sometimes there is that on a set anyway, different groupings, and I hate that. So, that part I didn’t like. The grouping part was tough, but you understand; it’s a global pandemic.

It’s hilarious that we actually lived during – we’re living still. They never would have wrote this for Wynonna Earp. It’s too crazy. All the crazy stuff we did, but they never would have went to pandemic, because that’s just too nuts, and yet, here we are. We’re all dressed as Mortal Kombat characters.

Interview Transcribed by Jamie of http://www.scifivision.com

MORE INFO:

poster for "Wynonna Earp" on Syfy

Tim Rozon

Doc Holliday, “Wynonna Earp”

Tim Rozon stars on SYFY’s WYNONNA EARP as Doc Holliday, the legendary gunslinger, friend and partner of Wyatt Earp, and now immortal “will they or won’t they” love interest to Wynonna Earp. He is handsome and charming and knows just what he must do to survive in Purgatory. Doc’s on a mission of his own to right the wrongs of his past before they consume him.

Rozon’s first leading role was playing heartthrob Tommy Quincy opposite Alexz Johnson and Laura Vandervoort on the teen drama series, “Instant Star.” Other notable credits include playing Mutt Schitt on “Schitt’s Creek,” gang infiltrator Alex Caine on “Befriend and Betray,” outer space rogue Isaac on SYFY’s VAGRANT QUEEN, and love interest to Candice Cameron Bure on “Christmas Town.” Guest appearances include “Rookie Blue,” “Flashpoint,” “The Listener,” “Heartland,” “Combat Hospital,” “Lost Girl,” “Being Human” and ”19-2.” Rozon won a prestigious Gemini Award for his performance on “Flashpoint” and was nominated for his role in “Befriend and Betray.”

Rozon currently resides in Montreal, where he co-owns the hit restaurants Garde Manger and Le Bremner opposite star chef Chuck Hughes.

WYNONNA EARP follows legendary law man Wyatt Earp’s descendant, Wynonna (Melanie Scrofano) who inherits his mystical gun, Peacemaker. With it, Wynonna and her posse of dysfunctional allies must fight against supernatural beings and other paranormal occurrences in a raucous, whisky-soaked struggle to break her family’s demonic curse.

In Season 4, the infamous Earp Curse is broken, and witty and wild demon hunter Wynonna Earp would love to be celebrating with cold whisky and hot donuts. Too bad she has to rescue everyone she loves, save the town of Purgatory, and take on her most diabolical, Earp-hating enemy yet — all without her trustworthy gun, Peacemaker. And that’s just Monday…

WYNONNA EARP is produced in Calgary by Seven24 Films and globally distributed by IDW Entertainment and Cineflix Rights. Emily Andras developed the series for television and continues to serve as showrunner and executive producer. Jordy Randall, Tom Cox, Rick Jacobs, Todd Berger, Peter Emerson and Brett Burlock also serve as executive producers.

Twitter: @WynonnaEarp
Instagram: @WynonnaEarp
Hashtag: #WynonnaEarp

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Tim Rozon as Doc Holliday on "Wynonna Earp" on Syfy

Interview with Chris Sheridan and Sara Tomko

TV Interview!

Chris Sheridan and Sara Tomko of "Resident Alien" on Syfy

Interview with Chris Sheridan and Sara Tomko of “Resident Alien” on Syfy by Suzanne 2/22/21

I love this show, and it was great to talk with these two, even for the short time I had with them. They had great answers to my question. There other questions came from the other press interviewers on the Zoom call.

Here’s the video of our interview!

Question:   What’s been the most satisfying aspect of the response to the show so far?

Chris:   Gonna preview this by saying that I thought I was the only one who didn’t read any reviews, and as it turns out, Sara doesn’t read any either. That being said, I know I did join Twitter, and I do try to live tweet for an hour during the show. So, I do get to see a little bit of what people are saying. For me, and I’ll let Sarah talk, but for me, I mean, it’s been a long road; it’s been five years.

So, to put all this effort into something – and by the way, this happens all the time  – you put all this effort into something, and it doesn’t work for one reason or another, or you think it works, but no one likes it. So, to put all this effort into something for the main purpose of getting people to feel maybe better about their lives or better about feeling human, or getting them through the day or [giving them] something to look forward to, and look forward to laughing, and finding out that people really are doing that and enjoying it and looking forward to it and even in a small way having it make their lives a little better. I mean, yeah, it makes all the hard work over the last – you know, for me over the last five years – worth it. So, that’s the greatest thing, for me, is just feeling like you’re touching people in a way, even making them lives a tiny bit better. So, I love that.

Sarah?

Sara:   Yeah, I, like Chris, do not read the reviews, just so I kind of stay grounded. I don’t think too much about good or bad. I just kind of wanted to separate between just doing the work and letting the work speak for itself.

But it’s impossible to not hear from family and friends, especially who will send me sometimes things…but it’s so lovely, because they’re obviously very excited.

Meredith Garretson and I, who plays Kate, she’s one of my best friends, and right before the show premiered, we were talking about [how] it never occurred to us. What if we just aren’t good? We were all like, “It’s been two and a half years.” Corey [Reynolds], especially, would hype us up, like, “Yeah, of course, this is gonna go. Of course, it’s gonna be good.” We would always have these pep talks. Then, you get to that point where you’re about to reveal, and you’re like, “Oh, god, what if it’s not good?”

So, to hear that it is exactly what we believed it was, to hear that people are not only enjoying it, they’re inspired by it, that it’s something that’s bringing them solace in a time of grief – We’ve had a lot of really wonderful people reach out individually to us, and we have a little alien thread that we have going on. So, people are always letting us know, like my friend said “this,” or, my cousin said “that,” and, you know, my family is just floored. It feels really lovely to be seen by them in that way. They’ve known for a long time I’ve been an actor, and they’ve seen me do other parts. But I can’t tell you how many of them were like, “You have so much screen time.” [unintelligible] like they didn’t quite understand that. I’m like, “Yeah, I’m the lead next to Alan…” So, that part’s been really, really rewarding, and I just want people to continue to like it and continue to watch it, so we can get that season two, and three, and four, and the list goes on.

Question:   Chris, what made this a story you wanted to tell in the first place, and for Sara, what made Asta an irresistible character for you to play?

Chris:   I’ll jump in. I fell in love with Peter Hogan and Steve Parkhouse’s  comic, Resident Alien. What I loved about it mostly was this outsider alien observing human nature and trying to figure out what it’s like to be human. Out of all the things I loved about it, that one thing to me is the soul of the comment that I wanted to capture in the show. I really wanted to be able to tell a story about humanity and be able to sort of pick it apart and figure out, you know, what it is that makes us human, that makes us good, that makes us bad. Being able to do that in a light hearted way, through the eyes of this is new being coming to earth, I knew it’d be entertaining, and I thought that would be a really fun journey for me, as a writer, to sort of go down. That’s what really drew me to it.

Sara:   The thing that’s so enticing and intoxicating about playing this role is how vulnerable I get to be, how honest. When I was younger, especially early in my career, I longed for a character like this, I really did. You know, you’re in the industry, if you get a role worth a damn, it’s like, that’s a win. As a woman, if you get a roll that doesn’t have to just do with how you look, that’s a win, and if you get a role that the story’s great, and then the cast is great. I mean, then on top of it, it gets picked up and people like it. It’s just one checkbox after another with this show. That doesn’t happen for everybody. So, I just really feel grateful that my very specific dreams came true, which was I wanted to play a raw, vulnerable, honest, multilayered, larger than life character, and I think that’s what I got with Asta.

I think that the whole cast was brought together by a fate that none of us can really explain, which makes me feel really confident about our future. Even if the show didn’t go on, I believe that we all have this synergy now that we will continue to create things together in the future, because it just it works so well.

And I just I love playing her. I love being able to also be a woman on screen who looks like a woman. I [don’t have] the perfect body, not the perfect temperament, like that. That’s no shame or anything; that’s just the truth of being a woman. I get to just be that, and it’s it’s not pretty all the time. In fact, she’s messy. So, it’s really nice to be able to show that and show that that’s what it really is like most days for most people.

Question:   [What does] Asta think of how he changed the more he’s around? And how might you react if she finds out the truth?

Sara:   Whoo, how has it changed? Well, we have to get in pretty quickly to her trusting him. So, I think right away, it’s obvious, because this town is so small and so reliant on the doctor, which is what everyone tells him, you know, as a therapist, as someone who was like a father figure to me. I mean, we have to really just allow Harry into our world and let him replace someone that was really the heart of the town is what it really feels like.

So, it changes for me, because Asta has this ability to really hear a man in her life tell her the truth, the honest truth, and nothing but the truth. So, she finally gets an experience with a friend and a man that is unlike no other. So, that, ultimately, leads her to rethink how she looks at life and how she trusts men.

I think that, ultimately, leads to this question for the audience of, “What’s going to happen when she finds out?“ But he’s lied to her this whole time. I mean, it’s a really big irony. When I took on the role, I really didn’t know what would happen if she ever found out. I think there are ways that maybe there’s an understanding somehow oddly to [be], “Yeah, that makes sense. It makes sense, but you’re weird; you’re that weird.” But I also think that there’s going to be a feeling of betrayal if she ever finds out that information. That will be something that Harry’s gonna have to deal with. And he’s not gonna like when Asta is mad at him. He likes watching her get angry, but he’s never had it at him.

Chris:   Aimed at him, exactly right.

Question:   For Mr. Sheridan, once you saw what Alan Tudyk was doing with the role, were there any things that you wrote towards or away from?

Chris:   That’s a great question, and there was nothing that I wrote away from and everything that I wrote towards, and that we all in the writers room did. I mean, he’s so gifted that there was actually – I mean, the very simple quick answer is, there’s a sequence in in Episode Two, where he comments that he can’t switch bodies; he can’t leave and switch bodies to someone else. It took him three weeks to learn this body, and we just do a quick montage of him trying to learn how to walk and trying to sit down and, you know, can’t brush his teeth. That was that sequence I specifically put in for no other reason than the fact that it was Alan. And when I realized how talented he was, I mean, this is a guy who went to Juilliard and literally studied clowning, and when I could see what he could do with his body and his movements and how he really encapsulated this character, it just gave you so many places to go and so many ideas. So, that sequence specifically was for his strengths, but so much of it is stuff that he’s just doing on his own, all of this stuff that he does, with his hands. Even in the pilot, when he leans over Sam’s body and looks at it like this, this is him just naturally as an actor, sort of mimicking his sort of alien little baby arms that he has. That wasn’t anything anyone told him; that was just him sliding into the role and the physicality of the role. So much of what he does in the show, certainly physically and stuff that he’s brought to it, it’s writing to all his strengths. It’s realizing he can kind of do anything.

The other aspect of it, I’ll say really quick, is there are scenes in it in this season where we will see – and there was one in the pilot in the beginning, but there are more scenes coming up, where we will see what the real Harry Vanderspeigle was like. That was put in specifically to show the range of Alan Tudyk. You really get a chance to see what he’s doing with this alien role when you see Alan playing the real Harry Vanderspeigle, who’s not an alien, and see the differences between the two. So, as an audience, you’ll have an opportunity to experience that as well as the season goes on.

Question:   How does playing opposite him inform how you play Asta?

Sara:   Yeah, I was just about to say, actually, I think it’s really awesome to see the range he gets to play. I think there’s a lot of people that understand his comedy in his career, but Episode Four, when we’re lying down in the field, and he’s talking about his wife that’s passed on, there was this look that he has in his eyes that I don’t know if anybody’s ever seen Alan portray that kind of an emotion. I got a chance to see it a couple of times while we were working together, and it’s really beautiful. It’s really something that I think people don’t realize is in his bag of tricks, and it’s not a trick, it’s him just truly having a moment of stillness and honesty.  So, most of the time, obviously, when I’m playing opposite of him, I just sit back and watch. All those reactions are real and organic.

My little brother was like, “I think Asta’s reaction is going to become like an Asta-ism,” like one of her claims to fame. There’s so much range to what he’s doing that I can’t keep making the same face, otherwise, it’ll just be one note. So, I appreciate that he switches it up, because then it gives me the opportunity to have fresh reactions to him every time that are very real, and it’s so fun. When you’re on set, you want to be able to be in the moment.

Alan and I had a scene that you’ll get to see towards the end of the season that was a bit emotional, a little explosive, too, and it was really interesting to witness how we both approached that work. You know, he shows up – and we talked about this later, he shows up, kind of wanting to work at it from the ground up, this idea of how to get into it, and I show up wanting to kind of explode onto the scene and like soften into it. So, even as characters, even as actors, we have this different way of approaching it, but we always find our way to the middle ground, and our chemistry is really, really wonderful. You know, to be honest, when Alan and I do takes, it’s like two, three takes and we’re done. It’s almost a little sad. It doesn’t last long enough, because we just both click in so quick. We’re like, “Okay, well, good to see ya.”

Suzanne:   Hey, guys, love the show. Sara, I want to know how you feel about playing a Native woman, who’s a major character on an American show, which seems very rare.

Sara:   Yeah, thank you for asking. To be respectful to the other Native actors on the show, I am not a part of a tribe or a community. So, it’s respectful to at least acknowledge and showcase that there are so many wonderful Native actors on the show. Chris has done an incredible job being so inclusive to that community and writing so respectfully and authentically. You have [actors] like Eugene Brave Rock and my adopted dad, Gary Farmer, my, as we now know, daughter, Kaylayla Raine, and even we have a woman in the writers’ room, Tazbah Chavez, just so many incredible –

Chris:   [unintelligible]

Sara:   Yeah, so much incredible Native talent that I’m very fortunate to be able to play this role, because I have my own thing that I’m searching for in my own life, for how I fit in into this community, into this world, and where I belong. It’s so lovely to be surrounded by so many true Native actors who guide us both, Chris and I, who provide such guidance on what is really honest about a modern day evolutionary world of living on or off the reservation. It’s so lovely to witness that as Asta, who is raised in the community, but she’s not really one of them. So, she struggles with that. It’s the same thing I think I get to experience as Sara. I have my own family, oral traditions, but it’s not that I was ever raised in that community. So, it’s a little bit opposite, and I have to really sit back and listen and respect those beautiful, talented Native actors around me and say, “Hey, thanks for being here and showing up for us and guiding us on what is right and what is respectful.”

Chris:   Yeah, and I made some adjustments in the show. In Episode Two, Asta reveals that Dan is not her real father. She was adopted into his family and was raised with the culture, but is not native in the show. One of the reasons we did that, is because it was important to me that Asta felt like she didn’t belong, because that was the thing that connects her with Harry. Harry comes here as an alien and doesn’t belong to this world, and the fact that they’re both outsiders is the thing that connects them. And yes, as Sara says, I mean, in the process then of representation, there’re so many amazing Native American actors that we’ve cast into the show. There’s incredible native music that we’ve added to the show throughout the season, and a lot of these indigenous artists are having people hear their music that have never heard them before, and we’re really excited about that.

Interview Transcribed by Jamie of http://www.scifivision.com

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Read Our Review!

Based on the Dark Horse comic, SYFY’s RESIDENT ALIEN follows Harry, an alien played by Alan Tudyk (“Rogue One,” “Firefly”) that crash lands on Earth and passes himself off as a small-town human doctor. Arriving with a secret mission to kill all humans, Harry starts off living a simple life… but things get a bit rocky when he’s roped into solving a local murder and realizes he needs to assimilate into his new world. As he does so, he begins to wrestle with the moral dilemma of his mission and asking the big life questions like: “Are human beings worth saving?” and “Why do they fold their pizza before eating it?”

From UCP, in association with Amblin TV and Dark Horse Entertainment, RESIDENT ALIEN was adapted to television by executive producer Chris Sheridan (“Family Guy”). Mike Richardson (“Hellboy”) and Keith Goldberg (“The Legend of Tarzan”) of Dark Horse Entertainment (“The Umbrella Academy”), and Justin Falvey (“The Americans”) and Darryl Frank (“The Americans”) of Amblin TV also executive produce. David Dobkin (“Wedding Crashers”) executive produced and directed the pilot. “Resident Alien” also stars Sara Tomko, Corey Reynolds, Alice Wetterlund and Levi Fiehler.

Hashtag: #ResidentAlien

Proofread and Edited by Brenda

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Chris Sheridan and Sara Tomko of "Resident Alien" on Syfy

Interview with Alan Tudyk #2

TV Interview!

Alan Tudyk of "Resident Alien" on Syfy

Interview with Alan Tudyk of “Resident Alien” on Syfy by Suzanne 2/2/21

I was thrilled to be able to interview Alan, even if they only gave me about 12 minutes. He was very nice, and he was fun to chat with. I love this new show, and I can’t wait to see more.

Here is the audio version of the “Resident Alien” part of it, or you can hear the entire interview here.

Suzanne: Hi, Alan, how are you?

Alan: Hey, how you doing?

Suzanne: Oh, good.

Alan: I’m great.

Suzanne: I’m a huge– I’m a huge fan of yours, ever since “Firefly.”

Alan: Thank you very much.

Suzanne: And I loved “Con Man.” It was so funny, and I’m glad to say that “Resident Alien” is funny. I’m hooked on it. I watched the first seven episodes this weekend, and it’s just great. I can’t wait to see the next one.

Alan: Thank you, how brilliant. That’s great. Thank you.

Suzanne: You’re welcome. So, can you tell us how this role came about for you?

Alan: It came about in a very normal way, sort of like most roles that I’ve ever had. They’re all pretty much just a call, like, “Here’s the script. They can’t find this guy. Would you want to go in on this?” type of thing. They literally auditioned many people before.

I fell in love with it immediately, went and auditioned, and met David Dobkin who directed the pilot, and Chris Sheridan. They were, I think, on FaceTime. We didn’t even know about Zoom back then! They were on FaceTime, and I was in a casting office in Los Angeles, and it was one of the auditions that I got done with and walked away and said, “I think that went well,” because they seemed so happy. Not always the case.

Suzanne: When was it filmed?

Alan: Oh my gosh, so long ago we filmed this. We filmed the pilot two years ago. We started, and then Syfy liked it and said, “Okay, we’re probably going to pick this up. We’re going to pick it up. Yeah, we’re picking it up.” It took some time to come up with that idea. Then they said, “But we don’t know when we’re gonna shoot it,” and they kept – I don’t know what they were doing. I just assumed it had to do with scheduling and big corporate-y decisions that I wasn’t privy to.

So, we finally shot it, probably almost a year later we got into shooting the series, and then COVID came along and pushed us out another six months. We finished it just a few months ago, two or three months ago.

Suzanne: Had you worked with any of the other people on the series before this?

Alan: Never, nobody. It was great. Well, it was great, because we all got along, and they’re kind of like a whole new group of friends.

Suzanne: That’s great. There’re a lot of people in that cast.

Alan: I know. I know. I knew Corey Reynolds before, from his work, but I have to admit, I hadn’t met or hadn’t seen anybody else’s [work] from the cast prior. Everybody’s so great. I hope when people watch it, they enjoy the new faces. They’re so funny and good.

Suzanne: Even though it’s a big cast, they make each character so distinct that you don’t get confused. Sometimes, you watch a show and you’re like, “Who are all these people?” But they did a good job with it.

Alan: Right, yes, they did.

Suzanne: I heard that you went to clown school to help you prepare for the role. Is that true?

Alan: I did, well… I took a clown class in – my first clown class in the late 1900s, in 1993 or 1994 when I went to Juilliard. There’s a clown named Chris Bayes, and he runs a program at Yale, and one of his students Orlando [unintelligible] is a great friend of mine, who also went to Juilliard, but now he teaches clowning at NYU. I know lots of clowns. I love clowns, like real clowns. Clowning is a big part of theater training at the major schools around the United States, for sure.

When we did the pilot, I had identified… so much of who Harry was could be considered clowning because of his physicality, the challenges in the physicality, and his lack of knowledge. He’s just waved into situations without knowing the rules, the social rules, and he’s curious. You just have to put put your head in a place where you’re looking at the world where anything is possible. That’s kind of how clowns see the world, and I mean, I’m talking good clowns. These are like the Lecoq School of Clowning out of France. These aren’t the kind of clowns that hang out in sewers and kill children and make them float. These are the real kind of Charlie Chaplin type of Laurel and Hardy clowns.

Suzanne: It’s interesting that you brought up the physicality, because when they showed you learning how to walk and talk and all that, it really reminded me of like a comedy version of Jeff Bridges and “Starman” when he first arrives.

Alan: I saw “Starman” when that thing came out!

Suzanne: Yeah, me too.

Alan: Yeah, I love his performance in that. His breathing always freaked me out. [laughs] He went for real on that, like he was into the mechanics of how to – I don’t go that far, luckily, for me, because I can’t hear that sound again and again, but definitely the manipulating your mouth, you know, that sort of thought process behind some of the speaking when he’s learning to speak. It’s like you’re pushing air over the back of the tongue and you manipulate the tongue in this way to create these sounds and these sounds mean these things. So, he becomes alien pretty fast if that’s your thought process going on in your head.

Suzanne: When you’re looking like the alien, how long does it take for them to make you look like that?

Alan: Two hours. Two hours, and there is another version of the alien that we haven’t seen yet that is much more involved. It’s sort of torso piece that is closer to four hours, and that involves body shaving, and I’m not a hirsuite man, but any kind of hair becomes problematic. So, you try to go all swimmer with yourself and just lose all the hair. So, that’s no fun, but usually just the main one, whenever the kid Max sees me and you see me standing there in my flannel shirt with the alien head and hands, that’s a two hour process.

Suzanne: What was the best part for you, filming the series?

Alan: I love this stuff. Early on, you mentioned walking and talking and sitting and trying to figure out how to sit down. Any new experiences, especially the physicality stuff that is that the challenge for Harry, those are so much fun for me. I enjoy going to work and falling down. It’s just something I’ve done since I was a child. Then I learned to balance, and then I kept falling down, because I found it very funny. I like falling down and getting hit with things. So, anytime there’s more of the physical stuff, those are fun.

Suzanne: Thank you so much!

Alan: Thank you.

Interview Transcribed by Jamie of http://www.scifivision.com

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Read Our Review!

‘RESIDENT ALIEN’ BLOOPER REEL & DELETED SCENE REVEALED
 
Season Finale Airs Wednesday, March 31 at 10/9c
 
In advance of the season finale, we’re excited to share the hysterical season 1 blooper reel and deleted scene from episode 7.
 

Based on the Dark Horse comic, SYFY’s RESIDENT ALIEN follows Harry, an alien played by Alan Tudyk (“Rogue One,” “Firefly”) that crash lands on Earth and passes himself off as a small-town human doctor. Arriving with a secret mission to kill all humans, Harry starts off living a simple life… but things get a bit rocky when he’s roped into solving a local murder and realizes he needs to assimilate into his new world. As he does so, he begins to wrestle with the moral dilemma of his mission and asking the big life questions like: “Are human beings worth saving?” and “Why do they fold their pizza before eating it?”

From UCP, in association with Amblin TV and Dark Horse Entertainment, RESIDENT ALIEN was adapted to television by executive producer Chris Sheridan (“Family Guy”). Mike Richardson (“Hellboy”) and Keith Goldberg (“The Legend of Tarzan”) of Dark Horse Entertainment (“The Umbrella Academy”), and Justin Falvey (“The Americans”) and Darryl Frank (“The Americans”) of Amblin TV also executive produce. David Dobkin (“Wedding Crashers”) executive produced and directed the pilot. “Resident Alien” also stars Sara Tomko, Corey Reynolds, Alice Wetterlund and Levi Fiehler.

Hashtag: #ResidentAlien

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Alan Tudyk as Harry and as the alien on Syfy

Interview with Alan Tudyk

TV Interview!

Alan Tudyk, star of "Devil May Care"

Interview with Alan Tudyk of “Devil May Care” on Syfy by Suzanne 2/2/21

This is a fun animated show. Tudyk does a great take on this kinder, gentler Satan.  It was very nice to speak with him! It was only four minutes – part of a longer interview I did with him. He’s one of the few people to have two shows on Syfy at the same time!

Here is the audio version of it, or you can hear the entire interview here.

Suzanne: Hi, Alan, how are you?

Alan: Hey, how you doing?

Suzanne: Oh, good.

Alan: I’m great.

Suzanne: I’m a huge. I’m a huge fan of yours ever since Firefly.

Alan: Thank you very much.

Suzanne: They wanted me to [ask you about] “Devil May Care.”

Alan: Devil May Care. It’s on the TZGZ Syfy midnight animation block. I don’t know what TZGZ stands for.

Suzanne: I don’t either.

Alan: Has anybody has told anybody? I think it just sounds good together, and it’s for some reason memorable. I’m the devil –

Suzanne: Was it fun developing the voice for the devil?

Alan: Yeah, you know, he’s similar to a character I played in Knocked Up for a head of an Entertainment Tonight or Weekly type executive or something like that, which seems appropriate. [laughs] “Come on, be a team leader! “That’s the way the devil is different in this show.

Suzanne: He’s not evil sounding.

Alan: He’s not evil – not sounding, and not even in the way he goes about running Hell. He’s trying to gentrify Hell. He wants it to be a place where you can go and have a good time. He just happens to be the angel that got put in charge of Hell is the thing.

Suzanne: How many total episodes are there for Devil May Care?

Alan: That’s a good question.

Suzanne: Oh, you don’t know? It’s okay.

Alan: [laughs] I think it’s eight. Yeah, eight ten, but only like fifteen-minute episodes. It’s got like an Adult Swim type feel to the shows…It’s crazy.

Suzanne: It was fun to recognize Louis Black in the first episode. Are there a lot of recognizable guest star voices in the other episodes?

Alan: Yes, there’s somebody else that I was stoked that we got, but I didn’t know that we got Louis until I saw the episode, because, again, this was all very pandemic in the way we recorded it. So, you can you can record whole things and never meet another person. You’re able to talk and meet and handshake, but it’s just that we haven’t been able to do [that]. I don’t know. I don’t have a list of who all is in the show, but yeah, Louis Black is a cool cat.

Suzanne: You do a lot of animated shows, do you have to turn down a lot of them, because you get so much animated voice work?

Alan: Yeah, I guess I’m choosy in my animated work. They’re pretty easy to do, as far as the time commitment and things like that, but, yeah, it kind of feels like when you’re spoiled. [laughs] I love tacos, and then you move to a neighborhood that has the best taco place and [someone’s] like, “You want a taco?” “From where?” I’m at the “from where?” place. “Who’s making the taco. What are the fixins?”

Suzanne: Thank you so much!

Alan: Thank you.

Interview Transcribed by Jamie of http://www.scifivision.com

MORE INFO:

Watch “Devil May Care” on YouTube

SYFY GREENLIGHTS NEW ANIMATED SERIES ‘DEVIL MAY CARE’ STARRING ALAN TUDYK FOR LATE-NIGHT ADULT ANIMATION BLOCK ‘TZGZ’

— Network Also Greenlights Three TZGZ Pilots —

NEW YORK, NY – June 15, 2020 – SYFY today announced new original projects for its late-night adult animation block, TZGZ, including a new original animated series and three original pilots. Airing on SYFY every Saturday at midnight-ish, TZGZ is a 90-minute block of adult comedic, animated, genre-based programming of varying lengths. Since its 2019 debut, TZGZ has grown +7% in the 18-49 demo vs prior year, and continues to bring younger viewers to the network.*

DEVIL MAY CARE, TZGZ’s second internally developed pilot greenlit to series, has earned a 7-episode series pickup. For the series, the Devil (Alan Tudyk, SYFY’s “Resident Alien”) hires a social media coordinator (Asif Ali, “BoJack Horseman”) to rebrand Hell as the ultimate place to live, and the two form the most unlikely of friendships. Recurring roles are played by Fred Tatasciore, Pamela Adlon and Stephanie Beatriz.

Created and executive produced by Douglas Goldstein (3x Emmy winner, “Robot Chicken”), this 15-minute series is developed and executive produced by Amanda Miller at PSYOP in partnership with Titmouse, the Emmy-award winning independent animation production company. Chris Prynoski, Shannon Prynoski and Ben Kalina from Titmouse are also executive producers.

Additionally, SYFY has greenlit 3 pilots for TZGZ:

  • From ShadowMachine (“Final Space,” “BoJack Horseman”), CHRONICLES OF FRANK follows an overzealous squirrel that kidnaps an exterminator from the Bronx, transporting him to a magical realm where he must conquer the forces of evil and maybe win back his girlfriend. Ordered for a 15-minute pilot, CHRONICLES OF FRANK is created and executive produced by Chris Osbrink (Writer/Director, “Trip Tank,” Writer/Director, “Campus Law”), with ShadowMachine executive producers Corey Campodonico and Alex Bulkley.
  • In a galaxy far, far away there’s an epic war of the worlds where countless alien species will fight to the death – and THE BLACK HOLE is about the crappy dive bar where they drink. Picked up for a 15-minute pilot, THE BLACK HOLE from Starburns Industries (“Rick and Morty,” “Moral Orel”) is written and executive produced by Dino Stamatopoulos (Creator, “Moral Orel”) and Michael Waldron (Producer, “Rick and Morty”). Paul Young (EP, “Key & Peele”), James A Fino (EP, “Rick and Morty”), Duke Johnson (Director, “Anomalisa”) and Nick Weidenfeld (President of Programming, Viceland) also executive produce.
  • Heavy is the belly that wears the suit in THE POLE, a twisted, edgy comedy about the struggle for power on the North Pole. From Yeti Farm Creative (“Hotel Transylvania” Season 2, “Pete the Cat” Season 2), THE POLE has been ordered for a 15-minute pilot. Created and executive produced by Matthew Bass (Writer, “Future Man”) and Theodore Bressman (Writer, “Future Man,” Writer/EP, “Jungleland”). Mark Gordon (Producer, “Grey’s Anatomy,” “Ray Donovan”) also executive produces, as well as Frank Saperstein and Jay Surridge from Yeti Farm Creative.

More at SyfyWire

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Devil (Alan Tudyk) and Beans (Asif Ali)

Primetime TV Review of “Resident Alien”

TV Review!

"Resident Alien" on Syfy

“Resident Alien” on Syfy Review by Suzanne 2/5/21

I love this show. Syfy let me see the first 7 episodes because I recently interviewed the star of the show, Alan Tudyk. The first episode is good, but it gets better and better. There were many times I laughed out loud. The story is great, and it has many wonderful characters.

Alan Tudyk (Firefly, Doom Patrol) stars as an alien that crash-lands in the small, snowy town of Patience, Colorado. He finds this doctor in a nearby cabin and kills him, then takes his identity. His mission was to drop a small device that will kill everyone, but he ends up crashing instead. He then has to try to find his spaceship and the pieces of the device, out in the snowy wilderness.

However, the town doctor is found dead, so the alien, now posing as Harry, the doctor, takes over his office temporarily. It’s fun to watch Harry learn how to be human. We also hear his voice-over, which is very funny. There are many characters, but the writing is so good that you don’t get any confusion about who they all are. Harry makes friends with the doctor’s nurse, Asta (Sara Tomko), and her friend D’arcy (Alice Wetterlund), the town bartender. There is also a funny town sheriff, Mike (Corey Reynolds), his deputy Liv (Elizabeth Bowen), the mayor (Levi Fiehler), the mayor’s son, Max (Judah Prehn), and more. Max is the only one in town that can see the alien as he really is.

You’ll notice that the show will remind you of other scifi shows, like “Mork & Mindy,” “Starman,” “Alien Nation” and more. We’ve really never seen a scifi comedy like this one, however. Not only is it a comedy/drama/scifi show, but it’s also a mystery. For each episode, they really leave you wanting more. As the episodes progress, we see that Harry is not alone here and that there are some people who know he’s here (and are not friendly). Linda Hamilton (“The Terminator”) plays a general that’s hunting for the alien.

Asta and her family are native Americans, and it’s great that they showcase them because that’s rare on American TV. Canadian TV shows seem to show them much more often than we do on this side of the border.

If you’re a fan of scifi or comedy, you won’t want to miss this one.

MORE INFORMATION:

‘RESIDENT ALIEN’ BLOOPER REEL & DELETED SCENE REVEALED
 
Season Finale Airs Wednesday, March 31 at 10/9c
 
In advance of the season finale, we’re excited to share the hysterical season 1 blooper reel and deleted scene from episode 7.
 

Based on the Dark Horse comic, SYFY’s RESIDENT ALIEN follows Harry, an alien played by Alan Tudyk (“Rogue One,” “Firefly”) that crash lands on Earth and passes himself off as a small-town human doctor. Arriving with a secret mission to kill all humans, Harry starts off living a simple life… but things get a bit rocky when he’s roped into solving a local murder and realizes he needs to assimilate into his new world. As he does so, he begins to wrestle with the moral dilemma of his mission and asking the big life questions like: “Are human beings worth saving?” and “Why do they fold their pizza before eating it?”

From UCP, in association with Amblin TV and Dark Horse Entertainment, RESIDENT ALIEN was adapted to television by executive producer Chris Sheridan (“Family Guy”). Mike Richardson (“Hellboy”) and Keith Goldberg (“The Legend of Tarzan”) of Dark Horse Entertainment (“The Umbrella Academy”), and Justin Falvey (“The Americans”) and Darryl Frank (“The Americans”) of Amblin TV also executive produce. David Dobkin (“Wedding Crashers”) executive produced and directed the pilot. “Resident Alien” also stars Sara Tomko, Corey Reynolds, Alice Wetterlund and Levi Fiehler.

SYFY PICKS UP DARK HORSE COMICS’ ‘RESIDENT ALIEN’ TO SERIES

breaking news | May 30, 2019Alan Tudyk Stars in Series from UCP, with Chris Sheridan Executive Producing Alongside Dark Horse Entertainment and Amblin TV

David Dobkin Executive Produced and Directed the Pilot

NEW YORK, NY – February 28, 2019 — SYFY today announced the series pickup of RESIDENT ALIEN, a comedic drama based on the popular Dark Horse comics series by co-creators Peter Hogan and Steve Parkhouse. From Universal Content Productions (UCP), in association with Amblin TV and Dark Horse Entertainment, the series was adapted to television by executive producer Chris Sheridan (“Family Guy”). Mike Richardson (“Hellboy”) and Keith Goldberg (“The Legend of Tarzan”) of Dark Horse Entertainment (“The Umbrella Academy”), and Justin Falvey (“The Americans”) and Darryl Frank (“The Americans”) of Amblin TV will also executive produce. David Dobkin (“The Judge”) executive produced and directed the pilot.

RESIDENT ALIEN is a twisted and comedic fish-out-of-water story that follows a crash-landed alien named Harry (Alan Tudyk) who, after taking on the identity of a small-town Colorado doctor, slowly begins to wrestle with the moral dilemma of his secret mission on Earth — ultimately asking the question, “Are human beings worth saving?”

Tudyk (“Doom Patrol,” “Rogue One”) is joined by series regulars Sara Tomko (“Once Upon A Time”), Corey Reynolds (“The Closer”), Alice Wetterlund (“People of Earth”) and Levi Fiehler (“Mars”). The series will begin production in Vancouver this summer.

About SYFY
SYFY is a global, multiplatform media brand that gives science fiction fans of all kinds a universe to call home. Celebrating the genre in all its forms, SYFY super-serves passionate fans with original science fiction, fantasy, paranormal and superhero programming, live event coverage and imaginative digital and social content. The brand is powered by SYFY WIRE (www.syfy.com), the premier portal for breaking genre news, insight and commentary. SYFY is a network of NBCUniversal, one of the world’s leading media and entertainment companies. NBCUniversal is a subsidiary of Comcast Corporation.

About UCP
UCP is a premium content studio that operates with a highly curated indie sensibility, while simultaneously leveraging the power and scale of NBCUniversal. As fierce advocates for creators with an eclectic point of view, the UCP team develops pioneering original programming with partners such as Amazon (“Homecoming”), Netflix (“The Umbrella Academy”), Hulu (“The Act”) and YouTube (“Impulse”). In addition, UCP produces high-caliber content for NBCU Cable networks, including Bravo (“Dirty John”), USA (the Emmy® and Golden Globe®-winning drama “Mr. Robot,” the Golden Globe nominated “The Sinner,” “The Purge” and “Suits” ) and SYFY (“Happy!,” and “The Magicians”). UCP’s content library also features 800 hours of award-winning and critically-acclaimed content, including the Emmy Award-winning “Monk,” the Peabody and Hugo Award-winning “Battlestar Galactica” and the Emmy nominated “Psych.”

About Amblin Television:
Amblin Television, a long-time leader in quality programming, is a division of Amblin Partners, a content creation company led by Steven Spielberg. Amblin Television’s co-presidents, Darryl Frank and Justin Falvey, oversee all development, production and programming for the company. Amblin Television currently has thirteen projects in various stages of production including “Bull” and “Tommy” for CBS, “Roswell, New Mexico” for the CW, “The Haunting of Bly Manor” for Netflix – the follow-up chapter to The Haunting of Hill House, “Amazing Stories” for Apple, “Halo” for Showtime, a straight-to-series order for “Brave New World” from USA Network, “Cortes and Moctezuma” for Amazon, “Animaniacs” for Hulu, “Why We Hate” for Discovery, “Resident Alien” for SYFY, and the documentary films “Natalie Wood: What Remains Behind” for HBO and “Laurel Canyon” for Epix.

Some of Amblin Television’s previous credits include the Emmy and Golden Globe Award-winning drama “The Americans” for FX, Emmy-nominated HBO movie “All The Way” starring Bryan Cranston, “Smash” for NBC, “Under the Dome” for CBS, “Falling Skies” for TNT, “The Borgias” and “The United States of Tara” for Showtime, and “Las Vegas” for NBC.

About Dark Horse Entertainment:
Dark Horse Entertainment was spun off from founder Mike Richardson’s Dark Horse Comics in 1992. The company’s first major hits—THE MASK and TIMECOP — were based on Richardson’s creations and DHE has since produced over 30 films and series, including an Emmy Award–winning documentary, MR. WARMTH: THE DON RICKLES PROJECT. Recent projects include THE LEGEND OF TARZAN with Warner Bros., the DARK MATTER television series for Syfy network and POLAR, adapted from Victor Santo’s noir graphic novel starring Mads Mikkelsen (Rogue One) at Netflix. Current projects include a reboot of Mike Mignola’s HELLBOY starring David Harbour (Stranger Things) directed by Neil Marshall (The Descent), and THE UMBRELLA ACADEMY, a Netflix original series based on the comics created by Gerard Way (My Chemical Romance) and Gabriel Ba.

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"Resident Alien" on Syfy